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ColinUK

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
A quick Google suggests that being able to walk a mile in around 16 minutes at 70 is good. So you're not far off that.
I know I walk quickly and I walk with intent rather than just for the sake of walking. That said I really ought to get out and walk more.

This makes interesting reading.... (it's a study into the impact of walking for distance or for time)

 

Leadinglights

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
A quick Google suggests that being able to walk a mile in around 16 minutes at 70 is good. So you're not far off that.
I know I walk quickly and I walk with intent rather than just for the sake of walking. That said I really ought to get out and walk more.

This makes interesting reading.... (it's a study into the impact of walking for distance or for time)

I think we almost do that on pavement but sometimes our route is on muddy footpaths so that slows us down a bit but good to know what to aim for. Thanks
 

rebrascora

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
I agree, terrain makes a big difference to the pace you can set. In trainers on roads and pavements I can nearly manage 5mph even with my short legs, particularly on the flat but if you factor in hiking boots and rough, muddy, uneven footpaths where you have to choose your footing and steeper inclines and descents it has a significant impact your overall speed.

My point was to push yourself a bit when out walking rather than just stroll as many people do. Walking with purpose rather than just as saunter as many people walking dogs do.
 

ColinUK

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
I agree, terrain makes a big difference to the pace you can set. In trainers on roads and pavements I can nearly manage 5mph even with my short legs, particularly on the flat but if you factor in hiking boots and rough, muddy, uneven footpaths where you have to choose your footing and steeper inclines and descents it has a significant impact your overall speed.

My point was to push yourself a bit when out walking rather than just stroll as many people do. Walking with purpose rather than just as saunter as many people walking dogs do.
Walking with purpose (or if you’re near the sea then maybe with porpoise) makes all the difference.
 

MAC2020

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
At risk of diabetes
I agree, terrain makes a big difference to the pace you can set. In trainers on roads and pavements I can nearly manage 5mph even with my short legs, particularly on the flat but if you factor in hiking boots and rough, muddy, uneven footpaths where you have to choose your footing and steeper inclines and descents it has a significant impact your overall speed.

My point was to push yourself a bit when out walking rather than just stroll as many people do. Walking with purpose rather than just as saunter as many people walking dogs do.
Agreed @rebrascora and @ColinUK walking with purpose really makes a huge difference rather than just plodding along. Check out articles on walking speed "Walking speeds predict longevity - slow walkers die younger"




Likewise walking up incline may not help your speed but you sure do get a great workout, strengthening muscles, bones, the whole lot. Also longer the distance aids endurance, also beneficial. And a recent article I read said dog walkers are healthier and have a longer life expectancy than non dog-walkers because they walk everyday. I use this to persuade Mr Mac2020 to let us move to the beach and get a red or golden retriever. He's still not convinced though!
 
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