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Type2 cases for different paths

trophywench

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
The first thing the poster says to the patient is that everyone is different so here are some suggestions of where to start, not 'This is what you must eat'.

A bubble and squeak frittata? - ie a basin of mashed spud, with some boiled leafy greens chucked in, enough to completely fill the bottom of your frying pan and fried in fat. Ditto a fishcake being more mashed spud, bit of flaked fish, formed into portions with floury hands and again fried in fat. Presumably you don't make em like that so you'd need a huge poster to print the whole recipe on at your surgery. And you're also making the mistake imagining that everyone can cook stuff themselves and is interested in doing so - we know that some can't even be bothered to read the label on eg that tin of Baked Beans before eating it with a fryup or with half a large thick sliced loaf, toasted.

(Why on earth would residents of Penzance and thus registered with a Penzance GP (for whom the poster was produced) ever choose a Ginsters' pasty in the first place when there are far far better local ones available most places in Cornwall? Or to eat a fishcake instead of a nice bit of fresh fish? ie NOT likely to be farmed)

Ancel Keys was comparatively recent in comparison to Type 1s being condemned to death by gradual starvation and failure of all their organs since treatment with exogenous insulin was not yet discovered 100 years ago, since he is post WW2 so not all that long before some of us was born! In any case he was working for the Grain Board in USA trying to get Americans to consume more grain and grain products - which certainly will never assist anyone with diabetes and unsurprisingly was one of the things that helped fuel the increase in diabetes and obesity in the US.

Victorian banting (where banting meant a weight loss diet to achieve a tiny waist to show off the miles of taffeta in your crinoline, obviously) does not appear to me to have any connection with diabetes whatever.

The NHS RDA for carb is 260g for an adult which means I am eating - and have always eaten since before I left school in 1966 - only approx a third of that - and yet OMG here I still am at 71. I do not believe I could eat any more carb than I do, because you'd have to force feed me like the awful way they used to with geese for pate de fois gras. So for me, the NHS can stick their Eatwell plate where the sun don't shine, frankly.
 

travellor

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
The first thing the poster says to the patient is that everyone is different so here are some suggestions of where to start, not 'This is what you must eat'.

A bubble and squeak frittata? - ie a basin of mashed spud, with some boiled leafy greens chucked in, enough to completely fill the bottom of your frying pan and fried in fat. Ditto a fishcake being more mashed spud, bit of flaked fish, formed into portions with floury hands and again fried in fat. Presumably you don't make em like that so you'd need a huge poster to print the whole recipe on at your surgery. And you're also making the mistake imagining that everyone can cook stuff themselves and is interested in doing so - we know that some can't even be bothered to read the label on eg that tin of Baked Beans before eating it with a fryup or with half a large thick sliced loaf, toasted.

(Why on earth would residents of Penzance and thus registered with a Penzance GP (for whom the poster was produced) ever choose a Ginsters' pasty in the first place when there are far far better local ones available most places in Cornwall? Or to eat a fishcake instead of a nice bit of fresh fish? ie NOT likely to be farmed)

Ancel Keys was comparatively recent in comparison to Type 1s being condemned to death by gradual starvation and failure of all their organs since treatment with exogenous insulin was not yet discovered 100 years ago, since he is post WW2 so not all that long before some of us was born! In any case he was working for the Grain Board in USA trying to get Americans to consume more grain and grain products - which certainly will never assist anyone with diabetes and unsurprisingly was one of the things that helped fuel the increase in diabetes and obesity in the US.

Victorian banting (where banting meant a weight loss diet to achieve a tiny waist to show off the miles of taffeta in your crinoline, obviously) does not appear to me to have any connection with diabetes whatever.

The NHS RDA for carb is 260g for an adult which means I am eating - and have always eaten since before I left school in 1966 - only approx a third of that - and yet OMG here I still am at 71. I do not believe I could eat any more carb than I do, because you'd have to force feed me like the awful way they used to with geese for pate de fois gras. So for me, the NHS can stick their Eatwell plate where the sun don't shine, frankly.
Nope, no idea what you are on about.
Is a cornish type 2 different to the rest of the country?
The advice is region specific??
These are off the shelf items from Asda.
No grease involved, just oven bake or microwave.
I don't believe Ginsters are banned from Cornwall to be honest.
Does everyone in Cornwall boycott them?
Avoid baked beans because people who can't read put them on toast? Really???
(Just saying, no criticism of your reading ability of labels, while you brought it up, baked beans are just under 12g to around 15g of carbs per 100g, so just "....nuts"?)
But, yes, I do agree the fryup is unhealthy, but that wasn't actually mentioned, so maybe that's another critique you have made that should be incorporated?
 
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Pattidevans

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
On a lighthearted note, no self respecting Cornish resident would eat a Ginster's pasty. I was merely asking what in particular about the poster went against NHS advice.

In the middle ages they thought leeches and blood letting cured most things. Science has moved on as have many thoughts on the so called Eatwell plate. @travellor you are entitled to your opinion. With respect I beg to differ. Let us leave it there.
 

trophywench

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
I always wondered who the heck they researched to land up with everyone over the age of 21's - ie adult - body, needing that amount of food a day !
 

Drummer

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Yes, some carbs (those in beans and pulses) are constructed differently, and not all of the total carb content is absorbed. And for some people, the presence of extra fibre (eg in wholegrain or seeded versions) can help to slow the absorption of other carbohydrates.

However reaction to different types of carbs is very individual, and some people observe little if any difference in the speed of absorption of ‘brown’ vs ‘white’ versions.
I have found that peas and beans seem to have more carbs than listed - but I digest them - I have no problem with 'wind' after eating legumes, and my blood glucose goes up as though they have about 80 percent more carbs than they are supposed to provide.
A couple of others have reported that they experience the same thing. I suspect that there is a small subset of Humans who might have a gut biome or some other feature which causes this anomaly.
My meter shows that brown carbs are little different from white ones. The spike might be just slightly lower, but if anything it goes on longer.
Having followed GP's diet sheets many times and found they left me feeling weaker and heavier than before I started to struggle to follow them I believe people who tell me they are similarly affected eating low fat and high carb foods.
 

Drummer

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
@trophywench On cold wet mornings recently I have been having bubble and squeak made with boiled swede, veges and eggs, along with bacon. It is a lovely golden colour and sets me up for the day along with coffee and cream.
 

travellor

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
On a lighthearted note, no self respecting Cornish resident would eat a Ginster's pasty. I was merely asking what in particular about the poster went against NHS advice.

In the middle ages they thought leeches and blood letting cured most things. Science has moved on as have many thoughts on the so called Eatwell plate. @travellor you are entitled to your opinion. With respect I beg to differ. Let us leave it there.
You asked, I merely replied to your question with facts.
If you look into the reality of the eatwell plate you'll find it reflects the latest scientific thoughts of the time, and changes to keep up with the findings.
As you say though, let's leave it there.
 
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