Medtronic or Omnipod ?

Ref

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Hi all
It won't be long before the warranty on my Medtronic 640g runs out so I've been discussing my next pump with my consultant and DNS.
I like my 640g and I'm very happy with it but I do have one problem.

Because of my surgery I have a number of scars on my stomach - the main surgery cut plus scars left by drains etc. This means I'm limited in terms of my site rotation and end up back on the same site before it has really had a chance to heal properly.

I've discussed options with my consultant and she suggested the Omnipod - which I was aware of but don't know much about. I've done some research and ordered a sample from the website but wondered if anyone had made the same switch and could advise of the pros and cons they discovered.

I use a lot of dual waves because of my fast digestion (I know it doesn't make sense but that's the way it is) - is it good for those?
I also wear a libre - anything to be aware of when using it with that?

Thanks in advance
Andy
 

m1dnc

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Type 1
I'm just about to do the switch from a 640G to an Omnipod - I have received the kit and have my virtual training session on the 29th. According to the User Guide you can extend some or all of a bolus - see page 61. The User Guide is available here:
 

everydayupsanddowns

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We have a few podders on the forum including @stephknits and @mark king

I believe Omnipod are working with Abbott to get future versions of Libre and Omnipod to work together - but the rumours of these things always seem to circulate several years before anything becomes available!
 

Ref

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Thanks for the replies. It seems the biggest downside for me is that the bolus calculator doesn't work while a bolus is being delivered but I don't think I ever need to bolus so soon after eating anyway.

If you don't mind, can you tell me why you are switching from the 640g to the Omnipod @m1dnc ?
 

stephknits

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Hi, I haven't switched as Omnipod is my first pump but am on libre as well. The range of places I stick it is a big bonus for me. It goes on my arms, top of legs, lower back, stomach. I've never tried bolusing when I have just done one and it is delivering it. I do however do lots of boluses when I already have an extended bolus running and just ask it to not use my bs reading to calculate and it calculates fine from my bolus ratio for that particular time.
Any questions, please fire away.
 

Inka

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Apologies if I’m being thick (probably!) but I thought you could put pump cannulas in a number of places, similar to the list @stephknits gave above? I have a tubed pump (not Medtronic) and put the cannula in my thighs, lower back, tummy.

Is there some reason why the Omnipod is more advised for doing this? I don’t know much about it, so would be interested to know the thinking behind this.
 

MrDaibetes

Moderator
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Type 1
I have used Omnipod and I now use Medtronic. Omnipod is great for being tubeless and for that extra freedom but for me I much prefer Medtronic because I can have my CGM on the pump.
 

helli

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Type 1
I changed from a tubey pump (Animas) to a tubeless one 18 months ago (Medtrum because OmniPod is too expensive for my CCG). I love the freedom of not having my pump on a leash and having to work out how to keep it in my pocket or clipped to my belt.
However, something you may want to consider is placement options. With a canula, I was able to move it a few inches left and right and up and down. A patch/tubeless pump has a larger surface area to affix to my body. An inch left and part of the pump collides with my hip bone, an inch lower and part of the pump is too low, and inch higher part of it is under my belt. I am small so this is exaggerated but definitely worth considering if your placement options are limited.
 

m1dnc

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Thanks for the replies. It seems the biggest downside for me is that the bolus calculator doesn't work while a bolus is being delivered but I don't think I ever need to bolus so soon after eating anyway.

If you don't mind, can you tell me why you are switching from the 640g to the Omnipod @m1dnc ?
Two main reasons why I'm switching. Firstly, I want to go tubeless, mainly because I swim a lot. This was accentuated this year because I was 'stuck' overseas and was regularly doing two 50 mins swimming sessions each day. Although the 640G is alleged to be waterproof, I have never felt sufficiently confident of this to leave the pump on in the pool.

Secondly, the star attraction to me of the 640G was the ability to suspend on low when using it with the Medtronic CGM sensors. Unfortunately, the latter do not seem to suit me - not very accurate or reliable, and very fiddly to live with. Last year I started using the Dexcom G6 sensors and have found them to be very easy to use and consistently accurate. So this took away the main raison d'etre of the Medtronic for me. In most other respects though, the 640G is excellent.

Everyone's choice of pump, if they have one, is made for lots of reasons depending on person circumstances and prejudices.
 

Ref

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Thanks for the replies.
I don't use a CGM. I tried one for a short while but I had enough issues placing the pump cannula without trying to find space for the CGM as well. Also, as I have no pancreas and rapid gastric emptying my BGs can be a bit 'variable' - the warnings drove me mad.

@Inka - In theory, pumps fed by tubes could have the cannula in those places. In practice I've found it to be very difficult because of the tube.

I like my 640g but I am a little weary of the tube - getting caught on everything, getting wrapped around me at night. I hadn't even thought of the exercise angle.

What insulin do you use in your Omnipod?
Andy
 

Inka

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Type 1
In theory, pumps fed by tubes could have the cannula in those places. In practice I've found it to be very difficult because of the tube.

Thanks for answering @Ref :) We’re all individuals and all need what suits us. For me, my favourite cannula site is the thigh. I wear my pump in a Hid-in belt and the tubing just goes up to it fine. Same with my lower back. The only trickier one was my arm, but I found absorption there very poor anyway.

I do agree with your comment about finding somewhere to put a CGM though. That’s how I feel too.
 

everydayupsanddowns

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Interesting comments @Inka

I avoid my central abdomen (decades of lazy over-use on MDI), and generally use sides and lower back.

It has struck me that if those zones struggle it will be tricky to find pastures new... I’ve tried my thighs and didn’t get on there (felt stabby and uncomfortable) I haven’t tried arms but am put off by entanglement with tubing (I pulled out a trial leg site), plus back of arms are my favoired CGM site... and buttocks would get sat or leant on.

Which has led me to absentmindedly ponder tubeless pumps at that point.
 

helli

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Type 1
Which has led me to absentmindedly ponder tubeless pumps at that point.
As a tubey to tubeless pump migrator, I would caution changing for more sites. My experience, as a slim female with little fat, is there are less places to put a tubeless pump. I need to find a surface area the size of my whole pump which is flat, has enough fat and large enough for the whole pump rather than just the cannula. A pump rubbing against a hip bone or just underneath a trouser belt is not very comfortable.
I would rather not return to tubiness but I have found tubeless has pros and cons.
 

everydayupsanddowns

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As a tubey to tubeless pump migrator, I would caution changing for more sites. My experience, as a slim female with little fat, is there are less places to put a tubeless pump. I need to find a surface area the size of my whole pump which is flat, has enough fat and large enough for the whole pump rather than just the cannula. A pump rubbing against a hip bone or just underneath a trouser belt is not very comfortable.
I would rather not return to tubiness but I have found tubeless has pros and cons.
Thanks @helli that’s really interesting.

One of the things that has always put me off Onmipod is needing to find a spot where the ‘half egg’ won’t get knocked, or sat on, or leant on... because the profile is so different to the flatness of a tubed infusion site.

But I see many users who get on really well with them, so I had assumed it was just my lack of hands-on experience!
 

helli

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I
One of the things that has always put me off Onmipod is needing to find a spot where the ‘half egg’ won’t get knocked, or sat on, or leant on... because the profile is so different to the flatness of a tubed infusion site.
I have a Medtrum A6 tubeless pump. The profile is different to the OmniPod - flatter without the "half egg" so closer to the profile of tubey pumps but smaller.
I have never had a problem with regard to knocking or leaning or sitting on it. But it is fixed in a position for 3 days whereas the tubey pumps can be moved around on their tether.

Medtrum is less common than the OmniPod but cheaper ... which is why it was offered to me.
 

everydayupsanddowns

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I guess the hybrid design of Solo / Kaleido may offer options?

Only if they are available where people live, of course!
 

Inka

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Type 1
@everydayupsanddowns Do you mean “stabby” when you inserted the cannula? If so, the trick that works for me is to slightly lift the fleshy bit away (like pinching up in a way but much looser and a larger area) and then insert the cannula ( I use 6mm Teflon ones). I’m slim and muscly in the legs so that works for me. I use the upper half of my thighs from the mid-point to the outer sides. Sitting down and ‘relaxing’ the fleshy bit/muscle helps a lot.

I get your fear about running out of sites. My tummy isn’t great now (I need to choose areas carefully to get them to work) and when it first became rubbishy, I panicked, thinking I’d literally have nowhere to put my sites and get insulin into me.
 

stephknits

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Type 1
i use novorapid with my omnipod. I know people who stick it on their chest and shoulder area, calves and lower arms. I don't have problems knocking them off and don't really notice if I am lying on it. Am sort of average size (10) so not particularly skinny. If you are on Facebook there is an omnipod uk group which shows people wearing it in a variety of locations. The only one that annoys me is if I happen to get it where a particular pair of trousers stops. Otherwise I barely notice it and often forget where I have stuck the thing. Have you received your trial pod yet?
 

Ref

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Relationship to Diabetes
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I've tried using my thighs for cannula but it was too close to the muscle and I spent most of the time hypo so had to move it. I find my central abdomen bruises too much. I hadn't heard of the Medtrum before this thread but it is not available from my hospital.

I'm still waiting for the 'experience kit' to arrive.

The weird thing with all this is that a few weeks ago I would have just opted for another Medtronic.
 
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