Latest Covid 19 info

AJLang

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
JohnWhi all of that information is in the link that I’ve just posted above.
 

Keith McMillan

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Quoting from the NHS document near the top:
"Although diabetes has been associated with COVID-19 mortality, its scale and relationships with modifiable risk factors including hyperglycaemia and obesity in Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes remain unclear"

Obviously it will take some more time to get the full picture of mortality rates Vs conditions. In the meantime we should be protected with good cause not to return to work just yet because the risk is unknown. If the government can at least put us in a holding group on standby for now that would at least be something.
 

AJLang

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Well as an excellently controlled diabetic with none of the complications listed on the paper my risk rate appears to be 10x for factors that I can’t control. Plus added risk factor for
BMI being over 40. In the grand scheme of things for me losing weight won’t make a great difference to this because my risk factor will still be over 10x
but I will be better off if I have worse control and start smoking....joking I won’t be doing those things. This has all put me in a very strange mood.
 
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Browser

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Hello Everyone,

I thought I would share Diabetes UK statement regarding the recent article about coronavirus and diabetes. You can find it here:

From the statement:

Type of diabetes

The new data shows us that of the 23,804 deaths recorded in the study, 7,466 (31.3%) who died from coronavirus had type 2 diabetes, 365 (1.5%) had type 1 diabetesand 69 (0.3%) had other types. The majority of people (66%) didn’t have diabetes.

It also shows us that on average, people with type 1 diabetes are 3.5 times more likely to die, and people with type 2 diabetes are twice as likely to die, than people who don’t have diabetes when in hospital with coronavirus.

These figures only look at the number of people who have died in hospital as a result of coronavirus, and don’t consider the many thousands who have recovered at home or who have been successfully discharged from hospital.


I am no mathematician and apologies if I’m missing something here, but I don’t understand how the information in the second paragraph correlates with the information in the first one.
Out of 23,804 deaths, 31.3% had Type 2 diabetes and 1.5% had Type 1 diabetes.
Yet, Type 1 diabetics are 3.5 times more likely to die whereas Type 2 diabetics are twice as likely to die.
I can’t get my head round that.
 

Bruce Stephens

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Out of 23,804 deaths, 31.3% had Type 2 diabetes and 1.5% had Type 1 diabetes.
Yet, Type 1 diabetics are 3.5 times more likely to die whereas Type 2 diabetics are twice as likely to die.
Type 1 diabetic make up around 0.4% of the population whereas Type 2 is more like 15% (the correct value's in the paper, so that's just a guess). (i.e., it's just that we're rarer, whereas Type 2 is much more common.)
 

Lucy Honeychurch

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
There's a lot less type 1's...frightening reading...

Edit: in answer to Browser.
 

Robin

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
There's a lot less type 1's...frightening reading...
Except that, if you’ve got well controlled diabetes and age on your side, you'll probably have a mild dose and won’t end up in hospital in the first place.
And if you do end up being one of the small minority admitted to hospital, as a Type 1 diabetic, you’ve still got an 80% chance of coming out alive, and that figure isn’t adjusted for all the things like age, gender, heart disease, obesity etc, which improve the odds.
 
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Bruce Stephens

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Except that, if you’ve got well controlled diabetes and age on your side, you'll probably have a mild dose and won’t end up in hospital in the first place.
You're right that this only looks at deaths in hospital. And other things are still important, so being young, female, white, wealthy are still good things to aim for. Trying not to get infected is still the best advice.

[On rereading, the second paper covers all deaths and not just those in hospital.]
 
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Browser

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Type 1 diabetic make up around 0.4% of the population whereas Type 2 is more like 15% (the correct value's in the paper, so that's just a guess). (i.e., it's just that we're rarer, whereas Type 2 is much more common.)
OK I can see where you’re coming from. The information doesn’t mention ( if it does, I missed it. I’ll read it more carefully ) that it’s in relation to a percentage of the total population.
 

AJLang

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Sorry if I’ve already said this but my controllable factors give me a risk ratio of over 10x and that’s without any of the complications listed in the paper.
I think, but I need to double-check that the paper said that 19% of diabetics with Covid are admitted to hospital - but that figure needs to be double-checked.
Whilst my partner is working from home then we can fully protect ourselves but when he goes back to work, at a university, we can’t.
 

Lucy Honeychurch

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
My main concern is I still have to work, social distancing not always possible.
 

Ian T

Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
I joined the forum here today to get more info on this (I'm probably not alone...) and I did feel that last week's journalism was irresponsible - getting 4.8m diabetics in the UK worried but without any details or context. Congrats today to Diabetes UK who have clearly got involved actively behind the scenes with the journalists to ensure clearer messaging, links to the Diabetes UK website from today's news articles etc and much clearer commentary on the DUK materials. More to come no doubt and difficult to give a common answer when so many people have individual circumstances and mixes of other conditions or lifestyles. Agreed that a blanket shielding message would be a concern - same as advice to the over 70s - some more at risk than others.
 

mikeyB

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
All these figures are worthless. If you disregard other comorbidities, such as obesity, hypertension, smoking, you are focussing down on one element. Only if you present the figures for deaths among folk with diabetes and no other condition will the figures reflect the real risk.
 

AJLang

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
In the paper it gives additional risk factors/minus risk factors for age, BMI, HBA1C etc All of the detailed information is in the the appendices. Smoking actually reduces the risk factor and hypertension was found to be an insignificant variable.
 

Keith McMillan

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Diabetics with COVID death rate as gone up to 33% according to ITV.
Although the story made the BBC lunchtime news yesterday they dropped the story afterwards.
Anyone go Boris's number?
 

Keith McMillan

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
If you are as concerned as me (petrified) by this alarming news you could contact your MP.
Is there anything else we can do to get this to the attention on government?


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