Prediabetes and exercise nutrition

prediabetes42

New Member
Relationship to Diabetes
At risk of diabetes
Recently diagnosed prediabetes 42mmol. Regular long distance runner, any advice on lower carb nutrition before during and after running events? Or any resources that are useful for advice on nutrition for athletes pre-diabetes? Noticed that dextrose is relatively low sugar but obviously may still spike insulin?
 

trophywench

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Hi, I'm going to instantly call on @Northerner another member here, who was diagnosed (but with Type 2) the week before he was due to run in the Stockholm marathon! He - and others, should be able to advise whereas I can't.
 

Northerner

Admin (Retired)
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Hi, I'm going to instantly call on @Northerner another member here, who was diagnosed (but with Type 2) the week before he was due to run in the Stockholm marathon! He - and others, should be able to advise whereas I can't.
A typo I think @trophywench, I am Type 1 :) Peter, much of it will be what you learn from experience, so the key thing is to test often to monitor how your levels are being affected. It is a very personal thing. As you exercise your body's cells will become more sensitive to the insulin your body is producing, helping to keep your levels in check. You may find that can eat certain amounts of carbs periodically without them having an adverse impact on your levels, yet providing you with the energy boost that you really need over longer distances. What food choices work well for you can also be quite an individual thing as our bodies (chiefly our unique microbiome of gut bacteria) can process the carbs differently to other people - you have to find out what works by trial and error. I personally go for energy gels which I find I need after the first 8 miles or so, and then every 3-4 miles after that. I find having to chew things more difficult when I am breathing hard! :eek: If you can afford a Freestyle Libre sensor that will be a great help in determining your strategy :)

I'd recommend getting a copy of 'The Athlete's Guide to Diabetes' for a good layman's explanation of the science of it all, it certainly helped me a lot when I first got back running after diagnosis :) (As TW says, I should have been running the Stockholm Marathon that week! :eek: :) ) Good luck! Sorry I couldn't be more specific, but there is such a broad spectrum of possibilities that you need to find where you 'fit' and understand why :)
 

prediabetes42

New Member
Relationship to Diabetes
At risk of diabetes
Thanks @Northerner recently diagnosed, so still all new to me and having to change the amount of sugar intake for longer distances. Thanks for the book recommendation and tips. I know from my own training that bodies are unique and it will require tweaking, as I also have IBS and runners gut. Useful start, though, as GP has so far been unable to find a dietitian with the requisite skills to combine all those factors! Many thanks for your time and help. Peter
 

trophywench

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Northie of course I know you are T1 - but thought you'd be quite likely to know about how much extra oomph a bloke needs on a long run, more in the overall nutritional sense than directly of glucose specifically, what different commercial products sustain people well.

Peter - perhaps you could contact Loughborough Uni yourself since they specialise in everything to do with Sport - Nutrition included. Used to be where the majority of sports/games teachers at senior schools, obtained their degrees and they always welcomed school sports teams (of older, sensible students rather than the 11 yos LOL) - I and a few others often went as spectators with the school basketball team, who would have a pre- arranged evening match with some of their students, ref'd by a member of their staff. And it wasn't at all one-sided either.

Just a thought.
 

Northerner

Admin (Retired)
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Just another thought - I once met someone at a forum meet who had had the good fortune to have a referral to Dr Ian Gallen, who is the endocrinologist at the Royal Berkshire Hospital in Reading, and who completely turned around his situation. He was the man who helped Sir Steve Redgrave to his gold medal in Sydney after his diagnosis, and also consultant to Theresa May. There is a website for people with Type 1 diabetes that he is part of called Runsweet, so well worth a look for some of the general advice regarding diabetes and exercise:

 
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