Motivation

MickW

Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Hi all, I was diagnosed with Type 2 a few months ago, and after the initial shock and reading everything that was suggested on this forum I was determined to get this under control. But as time has gone on I seem to relapse quite often and then realise what I have done. I am struggling with motivation to change my ways even though I know I really need to.
 

everydayupsanddowns

Administrator
Staff member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Thanks for sharing @MickW

It certainly can feel like an uphill battle at times.

Is there anything that you have tried that you ‘clicked with’ and which has been easy to maintain?

What are the things that have been hardest?

Do you think you tried to change too many things at once? Or not enough?

Some members over the years seem to have found it easier to go all out (eg not having anything in the house to tempt them), while others benefit from a more phased gradual approach.

There’s no right or wrong way, you just have to work out what works for you.
 

trophywench

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Mick, are you testing your own BG at home with finger prick blood tests using a meter? - just thinking that should be a good way of keeping yourself motivated to stay on the straight and narrow, when you could see pretty straight away that you'd been naughty - or hadn't!
 

Anitram

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Hi all, I was diagnosed with Type 2 a few months ago, and after the initial shock and reading everything that was suggested on this forum I was determined to get this under control. But as time has gone on I seem to relapse quite often and then realise what I have done. I am struggling with motivation to change my ways even though I know I really need to.
Hi, Mick. Two things kept me motivated after I was diagnosed. The first was testing my BG every day and seeing that what I was doing was working and bringing it down. I'm still doing it, but the motivation now is to keep it down.

The second was, and still is, knowing that poor BG management can, over time, lead to serious complications. Seriously, mate - you need to get back on track and stay there, and if you need support doing it you'll always find it on here.

Martin
 

Madeline

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Second testing, scared the bejesus out of me. Just don’t lapse on the testing or you sliiiiiide right back into those bad habits.
 

happydog

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Sadly having diabetes is a marathon, 24/7 with no days off for good behaviour. It is also something that we can take control of and do a lot to avoid the complications that may result. If you lapse put it behind you and see the next day as a fresh start. You can and will do it but it won't be easy. When I feel a bit fed up, and we all do from time to time, I remember going to visit my husband in hospital where although not diabetic, he had been put in a ward with three other people who had diabetes. One had just lost a leg, another had foot removed and the doctors were battling to save the foot of the third. A sharp shock for me. Do come on the forum and find the lovely people who will help and encourage you as they have done for me. I would never have managed without their support. Good luck and just keep trying, you really don't want to suffer any of the complications. We are all here for you. Please don't give up.
 

MickW

Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Sadly having diabetes is a marathon, 24/7 with no days off for good behaviour. It is also something that we can take control of and do a lot to avoid the complications that may result. If you lapse put it behind you and see the next day as a fresh start. You can and will do it but it won't be easy. When I feel a bit fed up, and we all do from time to time, I remember going to visit my husband in hospital where although not diabetic, he had been put in a ward with three other people who had diabetes. One had just lost a leg, another had foot removed and the doctors were battling to save the foot of the third. A sharp shock for me. Do come on the forum and find the lovely people who will help and encourage you as they have done for me. I would never have managed without their support. Good luck and just keep trying, you really don't want to suffer any of the complications. We are all here for you. Please don't give up.
Thank you for the support it really does help
 

Piglet

Active Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Hi Mick,
Don't look at it as a dreadful thing and you cannot eat anything. this leads to a depressive spiral... I am sure we have all been there at some point.

It is more a case of everything in moderation so have you tried smaller portion sizes with the carbs the smallest portion on the plate ( a portion is approx an fist size) and fill up on veg. I know someone who did this and reduced his Hba1c from over 100 to 45 in 8 months. Try counting cards to about 140 grams a day. Keep a food diary and be brutally honest for a week or so and then review to see where you can make changes. The changes you make should become the norm so they are sustainable (not a pre holiday diet) but remember if you want a chocolate biscuit or doughnut have one.. One won't hurt now and again as a treat.

I know I find that denying myself that sweet treat only makes the craving worse so treat the craving with a small bit of what you fancy. Denial makes the feeling down worse to so don't punish yourself for having a treat just be aware it is a treat and if that treat becomes normal you will be in trouble.

You can do this and we are all here to help.
 

ColinUK

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
I was diagnosed at the start of the year.
Yes it forces a change in the way of eating but for many that change is hugely beneficial.

Educate yourself. Look on YouTube at Diet Doctor or David Unwin for a good place to start. Try things out to see what works for you. And test your own BG levels to see what happens when your way of eating changes.

Lots of people find adopting a low(er) carb way of eating really powerful in controlling, or reversing, their diabetes.
 

Madeline

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Hi Mick,
Don't look at it as a dreadful thing and you cannot eat anything. this leads to a depressive spiral... I am sure we have all been there at some point.

It is more a case of everything in moderation so have you tried smaller portion sizes with the carbs the smallest portion on the plate ( a portion is approx an fist size) and fill up on veg. I know someone who did this and reduced his Hba1c from over 100 to 45 in 8 months. Try counting cards to about 140 grams a day. Keep a food diary and be brutally honest for a week or so and then review to see where you can make changes. The changes you make should become the norm so they are sustainable (not a pre holiday diet) but remember if you want a chocolate biscuit or doughnut have one.. One won't hurt now and again as a treat.

I know I find that denying myself that sweet treat only makes the craving worse so treat the craving with a small bit of what you fancy. Denial makes the feeling down worse to so don't punish yourself for having a treat just be aware it is a treat and if that treat becomes normal you will be in trouble.

You can do this and we are all here to help.
Agree with all of this. My family drive me NUTS, they tut, interfere, and can’t grasp that carbs are my enemy not fat, so Mr Madeline and I have some battles royal over a square of chocolate, or something equally ridiculous. It just makes you want it more, and provided you stick with the odd bit of chocolate or biscuit as a treat, it’s fine. My experience has been that being too hugely restrictive leads to 2am blowouts and a night of miserably chugging water and peeing, whilst cursing that last biscuit.
 
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