Hello

JackyAM

Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
HI there, just joined.
I was pre-diabetic a few months ago and have just had my second blood test, which I am sure is going to say I am now type diabetic.
I have been finding it hard to say no to the things I know I shouldn't be eating - and my Husband does the weekly shop so he gets them and then they sit there subliminally saying 'eat me'.
I have just been looking into increasing my fibre intake instead of trying to say no to things. At the moment I feel quite positive about this - it's actually a diet form I have never tried before (I really don't think there are that many I haven't tried).
I am currently about 5-6 stones overweight, with a very arthritic knee, ankle closely following and BK amputation on the other side, so walking and most exercise is hard. Throw in asthma and ME and I think 'couch potato' fits me as a cover-all term!!
Here's hoping I can manage something this time (really not good at finishing things TBH - unless it's a huge dinner)
Anyway, thanks for reading this - didn't mean to go on so long.
 

everydayupsanddowns

Administrator
Staff member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Welcome to the forum @JackyAM,

Sorry to hear about your mobility challenges and your amputation. Hardly surprising that you find exercise difficult!

Hopefully your blood test will give you a little more breathing space before a definitive diagnosis is made, and perhaps the opportunity to try to find a more BG-friendly way of eating that helps your body metabolise your food more effectively.

One of the biggest questions when trying to get to grips with being at risk of diabetes is often ‘what can I eat’ and while there are obvious things like cakes, biscuits, sweets and sugary drinks that you will want to cut out straight away, you might be surprised how much *all* carbohydrate affects your BG levels, including rice, pasta, potatoes, bread, pastry, grains, cereals and many fruits. So as part of your experimentation with increasing fibre, do be aware that some high fibre things (eg breakfast cereals) may cause big rises in blood glucose which may make them less suitable for you.

Leafy veg is a good source of fibre, and nuts and seeds can help too.

In general it will be the total carbohydrate content of things that you will want to watch. Many new members find it can be really helpful to keep a food diary for a week or two. Note down everything you eat and drink. Be brutally honest!

It can be especially helpful if you keep an estimate of the amount of total carbohydrate in the meals and snacks in your diary. It doesn’t have to be gram-perfect. Just round to the nearest 5-10g. It soulds like a faff, but it will really help you identify which foods are the main sources of carbs in your menu, which meals are the carbiest, and may suggest some easy targets for swaps, changes and portion adjustment. “Ah... if I have that meal with a big leafy salad and only a couple of new potatoes it will be a fraction of the carbs!”

Good luck, and keep asking questions. Nothing will be thought of as too obvious or ‘silly’.

And let us know when you have the results of your next blood checks :)
 

SB2015

Forum Host
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Welcome to the forum @JackyAM

Sorry to hear about your diagnosis. You have already been given loads of useful advice, so I will just encourage you to read around the various threads on here. There is a wealth of experience to draw on, and people are very happy to answer whatever questions you have.

Let us know how you get on.
 

Vonny

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Hi @JackyAM and welcome from me also :) I bypassed pre-diabetic and jumped straight in with a full-blown diagnosis! @everydayupsanddowns has given you excellent advice on your carb intake. If it sounds a bit scary to cut these out, I just wanted to let you know that the fewer carbs you eat, the less you want them! When I was first diagnosed and realised I had to cut out (or at least down) my beloved bread, chips and crisps I was heartbroken. However, within a few days of testing whether or not I could do without them I realised I didn't crave them any more.

I suspect your lack of mobility will make things harder. I do at least 2 walks a day, and to start with if I felt hungry I'd just bung my trainers on and go out for a little trot. I know you won't be able to do that. I'd start by asking your husband to try and buy fewer carby items if possible. If you have support you may find it easier. I still eat what the rest of the family eats, I just don't have the potatoes, rice etc and add some extra greens.

If you feel peckish between meals, a handful of nuts or a small chunk of cheese might stay the pangs. Best of luck, and fire away with any question :)
 

JackyAM

Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Thank you, all of you.
I have dabbled with low carb eating before but I suspect my 'all or nothing' approach was my failure.
I suspect that veg will be my biggest friend - something I knew all along really, but it's extra prep and I try to cut down standing in the kitchen time due to the knee and ankle. Maybe frozen could be my answer.
Thanks again.
 

Leadinglights

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Frozen are often a good answer as you can always have them available, or just take them where you can sit down to do the job. I am spoilt as I grow lots of veg and berries but freeze extra to see through the winter. They reckon nutritionally frozen are just as good as fresh.
 

trophywench

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Yeah! Just as Patsi Kensit and others told us on telly adverts when she was little - they're frozen that quickly after being harvested - they really are 'fresh as the moment that the pod went pop!'
 

silentsquirrel

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Thank you, all of you.
I have dabbled with low carb eating before but I suspect my 'all or nothing' approach was my failure.
I suspect that veg will be my biggest friend - something I knew all along really, but it's extra prep and I try to cut down standing in the kitchen time due to the knee and ankle. Maybe frozen could be my answer.
Thanks again.
Frozen is fine. I have a table in my kitchen so I can sit down when needed, or if you don't have room for a table there are things called perching stools. However, I do most of my veg prep while watching daytime TV, on a large tray on my knee, sitting in my big comfy chair.
 

zuludog

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Thank you, all of you.
I have dabbled with low carb eating before but I suspect my 'all or nothing' approach was my failure.
I suspect that veg will be my biggest friend - something I knew all along really, but it's extra prep and I try to cut down standing in the kitchen time due to the knee and ankle. Maybe frozen could be my answer.
Thanks again.
Hello JACKYAM and welcome to the forum

I have a slight problem with veg as I live on my own, and if I buy, say, a cabbage and a bag of carrots I end up having them for days on end, or so it seems
Though you can find loose veg and just get what you want

So that means I eat quite a lot of frozen veg, and just use what I want for each meal
Because they are picked & packed very quickly, frozen veg are every bit as nutritious as fresh - some would say better than veg that have been hanging around on display for a while

Iceland offers a wide range of items; many are not suitable for diabetics, but they do have quite a lot of veg, ranging from straightforward stuff like plain peas & green beans to to packs of various mixed veg
Have a good browse round the freezers, or if you can't do that, Search their websites, there are all sorts of things
Similarly most supermarkets have a decent range of frozen veg.
Again, Search the websites and send your husband with a shopping list

A meal I often make, that is quick & easy is to stir fry frozen fish pie mix and frozen stir fry veg mix together
You can do it in a large frying pan, though it is easier in a wok

Or you could make a large batch of veg stew (no spuds or pasta) then dispense it into individual portions for freezing

Oh, and if you haven't got one already, a Y Peeler makes peeling carrots and other veg much easier - Search for it on Google
 

JackyAM

Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
I did have a perching stool on the NHS, it got lost when we lost our pub! (I have forgotten who you ask for those things)
I remember Patsy Kensit in that advert, and it is true, frozen veg have all the nutrients, whereas you never really know how long that veg has been sitting around.
I never did get on with a Y peeler, I don't know why. I use a swivel peeler, but my hands get 'tired' and end up refusing to grip or even work at all.
I can just imagine the mess I'd make if I did veg prep in front of the telly - I make enough mess eating (I sound awful, lol)
 

adrian1der

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2

JackyAM

Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
UPDATE - I am diabetic :(
On the plus side my blood count was 'only' 56, so shouldn't be overly hard to get back down.
I am now on metformin.
 

everydayupsanddowns

Administrator
Staff member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
UPDATE - I am diabetic :(
On the plus side my blood count was 'only' 56, so shouldn't be overly hard to get back down.
I am now on metformin.

Good to have some certainty @JackyAM

Onwards and downwards!
 
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