Hello - newly diagnosed Type 1

Stephenhenry

New Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Hi everyone, thought I would take the plunge and register here. I'm looking forward to reading and participating in the forums.

I'm 47, and was newly diagnosed with Type 1 at the end of January, so a couple of months ago now. Like most people, it was a bit of a shock at first, but I think I have quickly got on top of things. It still feels a bit unreal, if that doesn't sound too weird? I suppose I'm still hoping the diagnosis was wrong and I'm not really diabetic after all!

But overall, and I feel a little guilty and smug for saying this, my diagnosis has focused me into becoming healthier all round. The way I see it, the general "bad things" to avoid (too much food, too little exercise) which make your blood sugar spike are the same things which make you unhealthy in general. So even though I wasn't massively unfit or overweight or anything, I've still been leading a much more healthy lifestyle just by overhauling things due to the diabetes: I'm down about 2 stone since January and have significantly more energy and zest than before. So all round I would say the diagnosis has been a good thing for me, even though I'm wary of saying that as it might be insulting to other people on this forum (and apologies if it is).

Strangely, I haven't been massively motivated to read up and research tonnes of stuff. I think too much knowledge would just confuse me. Maybe that will change when I have my first hypo. I've been lucky so far in that I've got my blood sugar level and steady fairly quickly (it was 41 (!) when I was diagnosed, now generally 5-7 with a few spikes now and again).

The eyesight thing really frustrated me. Did anyone else find that? My eyesight went all blurry in the first few weeks - then I got an eye test and found my short sightedness had actually IMPROVED back to the level I was about a decade ago, which was why everything was blurry. However, one new pair of glasses later it seems to have gone back again to my "normal" level, and I'm back to wearing my old glasses again. I really need to schedule another eye test soon now things have settled.

I've also found the support from the NHS and my local diabetic unit absolutely amazing.

Anyway, I'll stop rambling now. Just thought I would come on and say hello.
 

Inka

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Welcome @Stephenhenry from another Type 1 :) Yes, a Type 1 diagnosis can seem almost surreal. It’s a big change - practically and emotionally. I was diagnosed many years ago but even now I occasionally catch myself being surprised I have to do all this extra stuff:D

You didn’t offend me at all with your comments about eating healthily :) The only reason I don’t usually mention diet is because I think it confuses people who don’t have Type 1. My diet was very good anyway yet I still got Type 1 because, unknown to me, my immune system was busy killing off crucial cells in my pancreas:rolleyes:

What insulins are you taking? Are you carb counting? It sounds like you’re managing very well :)

Yes, the eyesight thing is very annoying. It gradually improves and goes back to normal for you.
 

rebrascora

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Hi Stephen and welcome.

I was diagnosed 2 years ago at the age of 56 and I can relate to a lot of what you are saying. Lost a couple of stone (mostly due to the diabetes but have followed a pretty strict diet since then), healthier diet and more structured exercise and I feel 20, maybe 30 years younger, fitter and stronger, but I needed that diagnosis to give me the kick up the pants I was lacking to do something about it before. Someone the other day commented that I should do one of these iron women competitions because I am looking so fit. That feels good when other people can see and comment on the difference, especially as a middle aged woman.

Sounds like you have been lucky so far and your diabetes is playing fair, if your levels are staying mostly in range and no hypos so far..... Long may that last for you. Many people struggle with what is called the honeymoon period where their pancreas continues to squirt out a bit of home produced insulin every now and again which can really put a spanner in the works and make things rather unpredictable. That might still happen if you have not long been diagnosed. Sometimes injecting insulin for a few weeks and months can give the remaining beta cells a rest and then they kick back into action for a last fling.

Which insulins are you using and do you have Freestyle Libre to monitor BG levels or are you relying on finger pricks and a BG meter? Libre is amazing if you get the chance of a trial and Abbott who manufacture it are doing a free trial for people who qualify.... details on their website I believe.

Anyway, good you have found us and look forward to hearing more from you in the coming weeks and months. The forum is an invaluable source of knowledge and experience, so dip into it as and when you are ready for more information, but you are right, it is easy to overload in the early stages.
 

Boom

Active Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Hi @Stephenhenry . I’ve only just returned to/ started using this site.
Diagnosed 30+ yrs back and now 57 yrs young.
Being diagnosed as T1 has probably saved my life. I wasn’t in anyway unhealthy at diagnosis but was blasé with certain aspects of my life. T1 gave me focus and reason to survive.
Your positivity will reap huge rewards for you BUT there will be times when the condition drags you down. Don’t get annoyed and don’t try conquering it by fighting. There are always positives to be taken from even the darkest days. Just remember the sun is always shining it’s just that sometimes clouds are in the way.
Good luck.
 

SB2015

Forum Host
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Welcome to the forum @Stephenhenry from another late starter. I was aged 53.

The eye sight issue is quite common and does settle back once you get levels back in rang. I also had been prescribed new glasses after a sudden change. My optician replaced the lenses as they felt that they should have spotted the rapid change, and my new glasses were useless once my levels returned to ‘normal’.

You are clearly diong overly well and I am glad that you have had no hypos as yet. Let us know what insulins you are using. I am guessing that you are carb counting, which does make life much more flexible, enabling you to match your insulin doses to whatever you want to eat.

Like you I lost weight at diagnosis and kept it off as I did make some healthier choices in the light of my diagnosis. In addition to prompting us to make good healthy choices, as people with diabetes we are guaranteed (in normal times) a full MOT each year with the annual tests that are done by our surgeries.

Keep posting and do ask any questions that arise. There is plenty of experience to draw on on here.
 

Ljc

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1.5 LADA
Hi @Stephenhenry , welcome to the forum.
It is great to hear you have a good team, i this is vital, so please make use of them and esp in these early days , keep in close contact with your DSN as much tweaking of insulin is usually needed . Your eyes should settle down , I noticed my sight was clearing after allot a month.
reading glasses did help I got mine from the pound shops .

Tbh I think you are wise atm about not doing too much research as their is an awful lot of misinformation out there and some places muddle up tT1 and T2 .

Ask any questions you need to about diabetes, we’ll do our best to help.
 

Cherrelle DUK

Online Community Coordinator
Staff member
Hi @Stephenhenry, welcome to the forum.

Just popping in to say hi! It's a great thing that you've decided to focus on improving your health overall, sounds like a great start to a life long journey of health and wellness.

The eyesight challenges can be a bit difficult but thins do tend to settle down as your blood sugar levels get under control.

Do let us know how you get on and if you have any questions for us.
 

Freddie1966

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Hi everyone, thought I would take the plunge and register here. I'm looking forward to reading and participating in the forums.

I'm 47, and was newly diagnosed with Type 1 at the end of January, so a couple of months ago now. Like most people, it was a bit of a shock at first, but I think I have quickly got on top of things. It still feels a bit unreal, if that doesn't sound too weird? I suppose I'm still hoping the diagnosis was wrong and I'm not really diabetic after all!

But overall, and I feel a little guilty and smug for saying this, my diagnosis has focused me into becoming healthier all round. The way I see it, the general "bad things" to avoid (too much food, too little exercise) which make your blood sugar spike are the same things which make you unhealthy in general. So even though I wasn't massively unfit or overweight or anything, I've still been leading a much more healthy lifestyle just by overhauling things due to the diabetes: I'm down about 2 stone since January and have significantly more energy and zest than before. So all round I would say the diagnosis has been a good thing for me, even though I'm wary of saying that as it might be insulting to other people on this forum (and apologies if it is).

Strangely, I haven't been massively motivated to read up and research tonnes of stuff. I think too much knowledge would just confuse me. Maybe that will change when I have my first hypo. I've been lucky so far in that I've got my blood sugar level and steady fairly quickly (it was 41 (!) when I was diagnosed, now generally 5-7 with a few spikes now and again).

The eyesight thing really frustrated me. Did anyone else find that? My eyesight went all blurry in the first few weeks - then I got an eye test and found my short sightedness had actually IMPROVED back to the level I was about a decade ago, which was why everything was blurry. However, one new pair of glasses later it seems to have gone back again to my "normal" level, and I'm back to wearing my old glasses again. I really need to schedule another eye test soon now things have settled.

I've also found the support from the NHS and my local diabetic unit absolutely amazing.

Anyway, I'll stop rambling now. Just thought I would come on and say hello.
I had exactly the same as you with my eye sight . Frustrating but it did settle down quite quickly. I like you have exercised more and eaten more healthily since diagnosis so there are positives. Keeping positive can be difficult at times and everyday is a school day with diabetes. You learn so much from others on this forum so pleased I found it . I wish you luck in your journey
 

Stephenhenry

New Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Thanks for the replies everyone. What a friendly place!

In answer to the questions about insulin, I am injecting 10 units of Abasaglar at night, and Novorapid during the day. I didn't even really know there was different brands of insulin, to be honest. I started on 6 units of Novorapid three times a day, but once I got the hang of matching it to my meals, I am only really injecting what I think are quite small amounts (not sure, as I have nothing to compare it to) - Breakfast usually zero (I have a cheese and ham omelette), lunch 2 or 3 units, dinner usually 3 units. How does that compare to other Type 1s? The Diabetes Nurse seemed to think it was quite small amounts and said in future we could look at pens with half unit measures if I wanted to and if I kept at that level.

I didn't actually lose a huge amount of weight before diagnosis - maybe a few pounds. My weight loss has mostly all been after diagnosis, since I've been on the insulin and counting my carbs. It definitely feels like "good" weight loss and not "bad" weight loss. I'm currently about 12 stone 10 pounds (height is 5'9).

And yes, I have the Libre. They asked me right at the start if I wanted one. It's amazing - so much better than the finger prick test. It's fascinating getting a real time reading of my blood sugar and seeing the spikes as they happen. And if I go down to around 5 or below, I can usually feel it and I have a bit of fruit to compensate.

The eyesight thing - yeah, I will give it another few weeks I think then go back to my optician. When they were at their worst I did get a cheap pair of reading glasses from a supermarket, but at the moment my eyes have settled (I think) and I probably now just need a tweak to my prescription.

Hypos: Yes, the nurse warned me it WILL happen at some point, so just to be ready for it. I have my Coke and crisps ready that I carry at all times, as well as the emergency injection - Glucagen, is that the name?
 

Freddie1966

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Thanks for the replies everyone. What a friendly place!

In answer to the questions about insulin, I am injecting 10 units of Abasaglar at night, and Novorapid during the day. I didn't even really know there was different brands of insulin, to be honest. I started on 6 units of Novorapid three times a day, but once I got the hang of matching it to my meals, I am only really injecting what I think are quite small amounts (not sure, as I have nothing to compare it to) - Breakfast usually zero (I have a cheese and ham omelette), lunch 2 or 3 units, dinner usually 3 units. How does that compare to other Type 1s? The Diabetes Nurse seemed to think it was quite small amounts and said in future we could look at pens with half unit measures if I wanted to and if I kept at that level.

I didn't actually lose a huge amount of weight before diagnosis - maybe a few pounds. My weight loss has mostly all been after diagnosis, since I've been on the insulin and counting my carbs. It definitely feels like "good" weight loss and not "bad" weight loss. I'm currently about 12 stone 10 pounds (height is 5'9).

And yes, I have the Libre. They asked me right at the start if I wanted one. It's amazing - so much better than the finger prick test. It's fascinating getting a real time reading of my blood sugar and seeing the spikes as they happen. And if I go down to around 5 or below, I can usually feel it and I have a bit of fruit to compensate.

The eyesight thing - yeah, I will give it another few weeks I think then go back to my optician. When they were at their worst I did get a cheap pair of reading glasses from a supermarket, but at the moment my eyes have settled (I think) and I probably now just need a tweak to my prescription.

Hypos: Yes, the nurse warned me it WILL happen at some point, so just to be ready for it. I have my Coke and crisps ready that I carry at all times, as well as the emergency injection - Glucagen, is that the name?
I’ve got the half unit nova rapid pen makes a massive difference to my control . I also have a half unit lantus unfortunately the quality of the pen means I can’t rely on it so gone back to prefilled pens . We all have individual needs I’m lucky like you and can get away with low doses as I walk a lot and eat low carb food
 

nonethewiser

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
I started on 6 units of Novorapid three times a day, but once I got the hang of matching it to my meals, I am only really injecting what I think are quite small amounts (not sure, as I have nothing to compare it to) - Breakfast usually zero (I have a cheese and ham omelette), lunch 2 or 3 units, dinner usually 3 units. How does that compare to other Type 1s? The Diabetes Nurse seemed to think it was quite small amounts and said in future we could look at pens with half unit measures if I wanted to and if I kept at that level.

Par for course when newly diagnosed, remember eating carby meals & hardly injecting anything for them, does go up as time moves on as pancreas gives up.

I'm on pump, use 18u basal 15u bolus to cover 3 meals, that 40 years after starting on insulin.
 

Freddie1966

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Par for course when newly diagnosed, remember eating carby meals & hardly injecting anything for them, does go up as time moves on as pancreas gives up.

I'm on pump, use 18u basal 15u bolus to cover 3 meals, that 40 years after starting on insulin.
I’m two years in and inject 8u basal between 6 and 8 u a day to cover meals. I stick to low gi foods and very low carb . I always walk 3/4 of an hour after injecting for breakfast and lunch . Everyone is different and we just use what we need to keep us in range .
 

trophywench

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
I'm 49 years in soon and use about 11u basal and bolus 1u per 10g carb so today 8u - but I'm 5ft 2 and not 'big built', didn't happen to eat anything much carb-wise and did some rather strenuous housework - involving moving heavy furniture - not a very usual day really!
 

nonethewiser

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
I’m two years in and inject 8u basal between 6 and 8 u a day to cover meals. I stick to low gi foods and very low carb . I always walk 3/4 of an hour after injecting for breakfast and lunch . Everyone is different and we just use what we need to keep us in range .

Also like walking mate, anything from 30 - 60 mins 2x daily.

Agree about usage, never got hung up on doses, is what it is. When using Actrapid in early years could inject 10 sometimes 12u for meals, doesn't matter as long bg is under control.
 
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