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everydayupsanddowns

Administrator
Staff member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
After the wholemeal toast debacle i tried my own seeded bread
I think the benefit of seedy breads for me is that it is much harder for the body to access the carbs in the seeds, vs when seeds have been crushed and milled into flour - so proportion of the bread just passes through :)
 

Ian Brown

Active Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
I think the benefit of seedy breads for me is that it is much harder for the body to access the carbs in the seeds, vs when seeds have been crushed and milled into flour - so proportion of the bread just passes through :)
Sounds eminently sensible, but there is still the same amount of refined flour in the bread. Do you thing the addition of seedy stuff slows the conversion of this refined carb as well?

Im going to make a plain white loaf, test before and after and see what happens. Ive just baked a seedy loaf, so I'll need to get through that first.

Thanks for your thoughts, let's see where it goes...
 

silentsquirrel

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Sounds eminently sensible, but there is still the same amount of refined flour in the bread. Do you thing the addition of seedy stuff slows the conversion of this refined carb as well?

Im going to make a plain white loaf, test before and after and see what happens. Ive just baked a seedy loaf, so I'll need to get through that first.

Thanks for your thoughts, let's see where it goes...
Unless the weight of seeds is very small, there must be less flour per 100g of finished bread. So the more seeds, the better!
But the fat and fibre inthe seeds and/or nuts should also slow the spike a bit.
 

Ian Brown

Active Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Unless the weight of seeds is very small, there must be less flour per 100g of finished bread. So the more seeds, the better!
But the fat and fibre inthe seeds and/or nuts should also slow the spike a bit.
Yes per 100g, but I eat bread by the slice, and i get about 12 to 14 slices out of a loaf. I make my bread in a machine and the recipes are identical, except for the addition of the seeds themselves. My seed mix contains poppy, sesame, sunflower, pumpkin and linseed.

So I'm getting about the same amount of refined flour in each slice.

It the wholemeal loaf that shocked me as it raises my BG much more than seeded, which feels counterintuitive.

Thanks for the reply, it's an interesting topic and i hope it's useful.

I'll keep up the story until you're all bored stiff with it :)
 

silentsquirrel

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Yes per 100g, but I eat bread by the slice, and i get about 12 to 14 slices out of a loaf. I make my bread in a machine and the recipes are identical, except for the addition of the seeds themselves. My seed mix contains poppy, sesame, sunflower, pumpkin and linseed.

So I'm getting about the same amount of refined flour in each slice.

It the wholemeal loaf that shocked me as it raises my BG much more than seeded, which feels counterintuitive.

Thanks for the reply, it's an interesting topic and i hope it's useful.

I'll keep up the story until you're all bored stiff with it :)
Perhaps try adapting the basic recipe by replacing some of the flour with seeds?
You might want to try weighing your slices to see how variable the weight is? With such a carb-dense food, the variability in weight might make quite a difference to the number of carbs, and resulting bg levels. Also half slices might be an option?
 

Ian Brown

Active Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Counter intuitive because there are equal amounts of the flour in both loaves by weight if not by volume. Therefore assuming the slices are approximately equal in volume, one has flour carbs, the other has the same carbs plus seeds and therefore has more carbs.

Also counterintuitive as we are told that wholemeal is better for us as it has higher levels of fibre, but that test will become clear once I try testing for the purely white flour loaf which I haven't done yet.

I hope that helps. Thanks for your reply it helps me and hopefully others improve our collective knowledge.
 

everydayupsanddowns

Administrator
Staff member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Sounds eminently sensible, but there is still the same amount of refined flour in the bread. Do you thing the addition of seedy stuff slows the conversion of this refined carb as well?
I’m not sure to be honest, but I’d always pondered that if a proportion of the volume of the load was being taken up by the seeds which didn’t surrender their carbs easily or at all, then that was volume that was no longer refined flour.

Fibre is supposed to slow the absorption of carbs slightly, but I think for BG-meter wielding forum members, that is often seen to have rather less effect than is promised!
 

Ian Brown

Active Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Hi Guys,

To continue the saga, same testing times with white hime made bread, only difference to the seedy loaf is the seeds...

Before test 9.3 after.... 19.6 arrgh

I officially love seeds in my bread now.

I will also add a pasta and a rice result to complete the story.

Has anyone else gine through this process?
 

Drummer

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
I got some wheat gluten to use when bread making. I add it to the mix of coconut flour, ground almond, milled seeds psyllium flour to help it to rise like wheat flour. I have not finalised the recipe as the first try was without the ground almonds as I realised I had none only after starting the process.
 

everydayupsanddowns

Administrator
Staff member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Has anyone else gine through this process?
Many many forum members over the years!

And each with their own unique disciveries of ‘that, but not that’ and ‘well I never expected it, but that is fine’ and also ‘good grief that is supposed to be slow release, but look what happened!’

It’s the reason why our general advice to new members tends to be ‘get a meter and use this method of checking’ rather than ’follow this diet sheet that works for everyone’ - because there is no one-size-fits-all, and everyone has to discover their own happy surprises and food nemeses :D
 

Ian Brown

Active Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
I got some wheat gluten to use when bread making. I add it to the mix of coconut flour, ground almond, milled seeds psyllium flour to help it to rise like wheat flour. I have not finalised the recipe as the first try was without the ground almonds as I realised I had none only after starting the process.
That sounds interesting. Once I get going on the low carb bread I'll post if my tweaks work.
 
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