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Tea and Coffee

Mikadokid

New Member
Relationship to Diabetes
At risk of diabetes
Is there a safe sugar substitute for us? Or is it a simple case of, just dont go there?
 

janw

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
I've been using sucralose for years, I don't pay OTT for Splenda, but get the supermarket's own brand, yellow lid, for around 89p. Don't need much as a lot sweeter than sugar, so saves on your pocket as well as your health. Never had any ill effects - am using it more now since getting diabetes and needing to cut out sugar. Personally there are some I don't want to touch (aspartame, stevia/truvia), but I guess we all have our own opinions on the varieties available.
If you can do without, that would be better, but don't make yourself miserable over it.
 
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rebrascora

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
I cut out sugar in tea many years ago because my partner drinks it without sugar and he would just forget to put any in mine and eventually I got used to it. I always said I would rather not drink coffee as drink it without sugar and 2 spoons was the minimum, but here I am 2.5 years after diagnosis and I drink my coffee without sugar (or sweetener) too. With the coffee I swapped to having it with cream (as cream is lower carb than milk) and that made it more enjoyable, but if I run out of cream I just have it with milk and it is OK now that I have overcome my sweet tooth. Really love it with cream though. It is one of my daily luxuries!
I do occasionally use a little sweetener for things like stewing rhubarb and if I cook a low carb sponge and I have tried a variety of them. The one I find most palatable is a Saccharin one I think but I have a whole range of different options in my cupboard including own brands and branded, that will probably take me a lifetime to get through. It comes down to individual taste. I think if you are drinking lots of tea and coffee than try to reduce the amount of sweetener you need per cup because too much is not good for any of us but try different types until you find one you prefer. Some of them I positively loath and would much rather go without than use, so it is individual.
 

Leadinglights

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Some people do seem to be more sensitive to some sweeteners than others either from a taste point of view, ethically or because it affects their blood glucose.
Different sweeteners do seem to be more suitable for certain purposes. Canderel now seem to do a variety of types advertised as being for cooking or in drinks etc.
An erythritol sweetener gave me gippy tummy, but I probably used too much.
It is true that tastes change and things you would have added sugar to no longer seems to need it.
 

chaoticcar

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Many years ago I had 3 spoons of sugar in my tea and a very kind and clever friend told me to put on a saucer the number of spoonfuls of sugar I had in one day (I drink a lot of tea) !!! So he advised me to put half a spoonful less for a week then half a spoonful less for another week .Now I can taste the sweetness of my tea is stirred with a spoon that has stirred a sweetened drink .I have my tea with a slice of lemon now very refreshing .
Carol
 

trophywench

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
I noticed immediately I gave up sugar in tea (in hospital the day I was diagnosed, still with the raging thirst) than with - that it's more thirst quenching without!
 

zuludog

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
When I was a boy at home we always had tea & coffee with sugar, we did it automatically
I tried tea & coffee without sugar, and thought it was awful; and after I had left home I just carried on with sugar

Then by the time I was about 28 or 29 I had put on weight, and decided to go on a diet
It happened to be about the 1st or 2nd of a month, and I thought - right, I'll have tea & coffee without sugar until the end of the month, and if after 4 weeks or so I still don't like it, well, I've given it a good go

After about 4 or 5 days I realised I was having tea & coffee without sugar, and hadn't noticed, and I carried on like that
That was years before I developed diabetes, so that was one less thing to bother about when I was diagnosed
After diagnosis I had to cut out carbs, biscuits, cakes, and so on, which required a bit of effort & planning, but you can adapt to that as well

The point is that over the years we have become used to having sweet things, but we can change our tastes
By all means try different sweeteners, but the easiest thing is to just get used to not having so many sweet things
Now if I do have anything sweet as a treat, I find it so intense and sickly that I can only eat a small amount anyway

I used to have a coffee percolator, and some sort of coffee filter machine ( forgotten which one) but I got tired of the palaver
Now I just buy good quality instant, and I'm happy to have that without sugar/sweetener, but I do like milk or cream in it
As well as ordinary tea I have Earl Grey, and recently I've been trying green tea; I'm not too keen, but it makes a change now & again
 
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Felinia

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
I always remember as a 14 year old, my grandmother saying the best cup of tea she had was sugarless, after giving birth to my father. She never had sugar again, and I stopped the same day she told me. I find aspartamate added to some foods leaves a dreadful aftertaste, so I avoid them. In fact the older I've got, the less I like sweet things.
 

travellor

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Is there a safe sugar substitute for us? Or is it a simple case of, just dont go there?

If you can avoid it, it's better to.
Some sweeteners are better than others,
Some on here like sugar free jelly, so I would guess they would be ok with Aspartame, Acesulfame K, but both seem to have a bad repudiation, and leave me with a bad aftertaste.
I simply stopped using it, but do like Chinese black tea, and flavoured teas.
Coffee I can drink with a splash of milk, just to take the edge off the acidity.
It did take a week or two to get used to the change, but I was counting calories, and a teaspoon of sugar was a waste of 20 to me.
 
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