Should Prof Roy Taylor be recommended for a knighthood for services to diabetes

DaveB

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1.5 LADA
Hi. I'm sorry to say I'm not a fan of Prof Taylor as he follows the Calories path rather than Carbs which to me is non-optimal science as Calories aren't a food group. I favour Dr Unwin.
 

McGregor

New Member
Prof Taylor's work with his magic MRI scanner has at last revealed the cause of T2 diabetes.
“When fat cannot be safely stored under the skin, it is then stored inside the liver, and over-spills to the rest of the body including the pancreas. This ‘clogs up’ the pancreas, switching off the genes which direct how insulin should effectively be produced, and this causes type 2 diabetes.”
Professor Taylor added: “This means we can now see type 2 diabetes as a simple condition where the individual has accumulated more fat than they can cope with.
“Importantly this means that through diet and persistence, patients are able to lose the fat and potentially reverse their diabetes. The sooner this is done after diagnosis, the more likely it is that remission can be achieved.
Which weight loss diet you choose to get rid of the fat is a matter of personal choice. It has been said that the best diet for the individual is the one they find easiest to stick to. Low fat, low carb or low everything will all work, as long as you lose the weight.
 

Eddy Edson

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Prof Taylor's work with his magic MRI scanner has at last revealed the cause of T2 diabetes.
“When fat cannot be safely stored under the skin, it is then stored inside the liver, and over-spills to the rest of the body including the pancreas. This ‘clogs up’ the pancreas, switching off the genes which direct how insulin should effectively be produced, and this causes type 2 diabetes.”
Professor Taylor added: “This means we can now see type 2 diabetes as a simple condition where the individual has accumulated more fat than they can cope with.
“Importantly this means that through diet and persistence, patients are able to lose the fat and potentially reverse their diabetes. The sooner this is done after diagnosis, the more likely it is that remission can be achieved.
Which weight loss diet you choose to get rid of the fat is a matter of personal choice. It has been said that the best diet for the individual is the one they find easiest to stick to. Low fat, low carb or low everything will all work, as long as you lose the weight.
Worked for me! I'd vote for him.
 

pm133

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Which weight loss diet you choose to get rid of the fat is a matter of personal choice. It has been said that the best diet for the individual is the one they find easiest to stick to. Low fat, low carb or low everything will all work, as long as you lose the weight.
That's a very good point. It's all getting a little too close to religious war for my liking with extremists on both sides shrieking at everyone that only their way is the path to true enlightenment. This sort of thing happens everywhere from software (Linux or Windows) to politics (left wing or right wing) and it's depressing and exhausting to see it very unhelpfully encroaching on the diabetes world. It's hugely damaging behaviour and I genuinely wish people would cut it out.

If I was Type 2, I would be looking for a little bit of both worlds. Cutting out some obviously bad fatty foods and reducing my carbs a bit as well. With combined exercise, that would be my favoured approach. The thought of permanently denying myself things I enjoy eating like milk chocolate and cereal/pasta/rice would kill any pleasure in my life. I don't know how others cope with extreme measures either way. I know for a fact I personally wouldn't be able to sustain it for any length of time.

Anyway, that's an interesting article. Thanks for posting it. Funnily enough I suspected that might be the cause of Type 2 without having the background in that area of science to be sure. Interesting to see it in writing from someone who is a recognised expert in the field.

The question then becomes about reversing Type 2. How easy would it be to get rid of fat from the pancreas once it has clogged things up? I imagine that you could lose the rest of your excess fat but still not be able to clean out the residual damaging stuff in the pancreas itself. I wonder if that's why it's so hard to reverse?
 

nonethewiser

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
He has done so much for so many of us. Does anyone agree, and if so, does anyone know how to initiate the process?

Guy has done sterling job & already has recognition for his work among peers & further afield.

Not sure how process goes, internet will likely say.
 

everydayupsanddowns

Administrator
Staff member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
I think Prof Taylor’s / Prof Lean’s work has been very helpful, and supports people’s self-management whether they opt for the 700cal protocol or a different weight-loss approach. It has certainly helped to change the ‘inevitably progressive’ narrative which was once frequently presented to the newly diagnosed (and which I always felt was particularly unhelpful).

It will be interesting to see what happens to the Newcastle Diet study cohort over coming years, and what sort of ‘maintenance’ eating plan they find they need. The experience of forum members over the years would suggest a moderate-low carb intake on an ongoing basis may well be beneficial.
 

Eddy Edson

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
It will be interesting to see what happens to the Newcastle Diet study cohort over coming years, and what sort of ‘maintenance’ eating plan they find they need. The experience of forum members over the years would suggest a moderate-low carb intake on an ongoing basis may well be beneficial.
Unfortunately, from what I could see in the 24 month DiRECT results, maintenance outcomes didn't seem to be much different from any other good-quality assisted weight loss program over that kind of period. During the 24 months, some large proportion of subjects needed "emergency interventions" to get them back on track. Once the assistance ends, I suppose it's a fair guess that the proportion of people maintaining weight loss and remission will continue to fall off.

Depressingly, it'slikely that weight loss maintenance remains really hard for a lot of people, even with the remission bonus.

Now that COVID-19 vaccines are sorted, scientists should devote similar efforts to developing a cheap, safe, effective anti-appetitie pill. I'm actually kind of serious about that. Surely we have enough evidence by now that for a large number of people it's not a matter of "willpower" or whatever; they simply need smething like that;
 

DaveB

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1.5 LADA
Unfortunately, from what I could see in the 24 month DiRECT results, maintenance outcomes didn't seem to be much different from any other good-quality assisted weight loss program over that kind of period. During the 24 months, some large proportion of subjects needed "emergency interventions" to get them back on track. Once the assistance ends, I suppose it's a fair guess that the proportion of people maintaining weight loss and remission will continue to fall off.

Depressingly, it'slikely that weight loss maintenance remains really hard for a lot of people, even with the remission bonus.

Now that COVID-19 vaccines are sorted, scientists should devote similar efforts to developing a cheap, safe, effective anti-appetitie pill. I'm actually kind of serious about that. Surely we have enough evidence by now that for a large number of people it's not a matter of "willpower" or whatever; they simply need smething like that;
Metformin started life as a pill to reduce your appetite so always worth considering. One of the reasons for my earlier 'not so keen on Prof Taylor' post was that the transition from the 800 Cal ND to a long-term life style is disruptive and unnecessary. Starting with Low-carb diet as an eating pattern for life is likely to be more successful and follows the science more than the ND as fats are not a problem for us (fat doesn't make you fat) which makes following Calories non-optimal.
 

pm133

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Unfortunately, from what I could see in the 24 month DiRECT results, maintenance outcomes didn't seem to be much different from any other good-quality assisted weight loss program over that kind of period. During the 24 months, some large proportion of subjects needed "emergency interventions" to get them back on track. Once the assistance ends, I suppose it's a fair guess that the proportion of people maintaining weight loss and remission will continue to fall off.

Depressingly, it'slikely that weight loss maintenance remains really hard for a lot of people, even with the remission bonus.

Now that COVID-19 vaccines are sorted, scientists should devote similar efforts to developing a cheap, safe, effective anti-appetitie pill. I'm actually kind of serious about that. Surely we have enough evidence by now that for a large number of people it's not a matter of "willpower" or whatever; they simply need smething like that;
I agree that it's not as simple as "willpower".
Unless the underlying cause of overeating is identified and dealt with, I'm afraid no diet will be successful. That cause will vary from person to person.
 

Eddy Edson

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
I agree that it's not as simple as "willpower".
Unless the underlying cause of overeating is identified and dealt with, I'm afraid no diet will be successful. That cause will vary from person to person.
Think it's become clear that for many people, maintaining weight loss can be as physically difficult as losing it in the first place. Their bods/hormones/neurology simply get things wrong and fight to get the weight back. For these people it's not mainly a psychological or behavioural thing. So - medtech needs to come to the rescue of nature.
 
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