Rice cooker that removes the sugars....

ColinUK

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Someone on Facebook mentioned this. I’d never heard of it before but it seems like magic mixed with science stuff.

Apparently it cooks rice in a way that it removes the carbs and is therefore ok for diabetics.

https://www.grayns.com/
 

freesia

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Just looked at it. It sounds too good to be true ! Did a currency converter, works out as £367.
 

Bruce Stephens

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Apparently it cooks rice in a way that it removes the carbs and is therefore ok for diabetics.
They're not claiming that, to be fair. They're claiming to reduce the Rapidly Digestible Starch. So reducing its glycemic index. I've no idea whether it works or not but it doesn't seem crazy.

Another idea (also surprising the first time it's mentioned) is to cook the rice (or pasta, potatoes, etc.), then cool it, then (perhaps later, and optional) reheat it. That produces some resistant starch. So much cheaper (and likely doing something different).
 

ColinUK

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
They're not claiming that, to be fair. They're claiming to reduce the Rapidly Digestible Starch. So reducing its glycemic index. I've no idea whether it works or not but it doesn't seem crazy.

Another idea (also surprising the first time it's mentioned) is to cook the rice (or pasta, potatoes, etc.), then cool it, then (perhaps later, and optional) reheat it. That produces some resistant starch. So much cheaper (and likely doing something different).
I knew that trick for rice and pasta but didn’t know it worked for spuds too.
 

Lanny

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Another idea (also surprising the first time it's mentioned) is to cook the rice (or pasta, potatoes, etc.), then cool it, then (perhaps later, and optional) reheat it. That produces some resistant starch. So much cheaper (and likely doing something different).
That’s exactly what I learned from members posting about this before, tried it & it really does work for potatoes & pasta: cut my spike after eating by about half; member posted it after having tesco frozen mash but, any frozen mash potato works! I tried it with rice & it didn’t really work, at first, but, find it works better now that I use frozen micro steamed rice that comes in pre portioned bags you ding in the microwave.

I had a wee think & I think it didn’t work for me the first time because of the way I prepared, washed & cooked the rice as I was taught by my mum: I’m Chinese & we, well a lot of Chinese people I know, think you lot, of Westerners, are mad to want rice that’s hard & DOSEN’T stick together; boiled rice that the Chinese eat is sticky, starchy & glutinous!o_O:rolleyes:;)

The frozen micro steamed rice, Birds Eye & super market own brands do various mixes of veg with it or just plain boiled rice on its own, is harder & not sticky at all that I’m used to eating but, it’s affects my blood sugars less!:)

Ssoohhh! Maybe you Westerners way of preparing & cooking rice isn’t SO mad after all?o_O:rolleyes:;)
 

Lanny

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
I knew that trick for rice and pasta but didn’t know it worked for spuds too.
Oops! :oops: A case of you posting much faster than me typing!

Yes, it really does work for potatoes & I posted for a while on the eating thread about baking potatoes, a whole pack of 4 at a time, scooping out the soft, cooked potato while hot & adding butter & pepper then after cooling stick it in the fridge to reheat in the microwave whenever I want to eat it. Now, I’m a bit lazier & use frozen mash in the freezer.
 

Becka

Well-Known Member
Ssoohhh! Maybe you Westerners way of preparing & cooking rice isn’t SO mad after all?o_O:rolleyes:;)
It is not about preparing rice though but being totally different varieties. So preferences, dishes, and eating utensils(!), tend to follow the types grown locally. So that means hard rice in America, chewy rice in southern Europe, soft rice in western Asia, and sticky rice in the far east.

Personally I find "standard" hard long grain rice to be quite bland and boring, including the frozen packets. I much prefer soft basmati rice in its place with western dishes. Add it also happens to have a lower glycemic index.
 

Bruce Stephens

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Did a currency converter, works out as £367.
Quite a limited market, then, especially in the UK. (I assert "in the UK" because my impression is that a rice cooker is an unusual gadget to have here. But for all I know they're really common, but I just don't happen to know about it.)
 

Madeline

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Yep, I can eat a small amount of basmati without it sending things loopy, sticky rice has disastrous effects though.
 

grovesy

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
For many years we owned rice cookers, some were even bought inAldi so not that unusual.
 
Last edited:

freesia

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
I have a rice steamer for the microwave. Had it years now and not seen another anywhere. Don't know what i'll do if it breaks.
 

trophywench

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Welllllll - going back a very long way when you had to get off the bus along the Soho Road in Brum (or down Sparkbrook, or Smethwick etc) to visit an Indian supermarket to buy Basmati rice, you measured the amount of rice into a clean washing up bowl full of cold water and swished it about. The water went cloudy. You drained that off and repeated and repeated and repeated until you had clear water. Then you drained it thoroughly for a few hours with your biggest sieve balanced across your largest mixing bowl or saucepan, shaking sieve from time to time. Once it was as dry as you could reasonably get it, only then could you cook it.

I wonder if washing the rice first, in the old fashioned way that the Indian sub continent did for generations before anyone in England had even tasted Indian food (unless they lived there for whatever reason from the Raj onwards) actually did the very same job that pre-cooking it now does?

Perhaps someone who precooks theirs, could try washing it instead and tell us?
 

Madeline

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
I can try that for you. I’ll wait until my BG has calmed down a bit, it’s having hysterics over the hot weather atm - probably because I’m firmly stuck to the sofa because of the humidity. Love an experiment though.
 

freesia

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1

Anitram

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
This is a good, short guide to resistant starch by Johns Hopkins University. Until I read this I had no idea that resistant starch occurs naturally in some foods, eg in green bananas:-


Martin
 

Drummer

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
And for some type two diabetics it is how to have a spike in BG every time, and a big one too.
 
Top