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Kimbo

New Member
Relationship to Diabetes
At risk of diabetes
Hello
I’ve just had my blood tests results back and was shocked to hear that I’m at risk of type 2 diabetes. I’m slim active and have a relatively healthy diet/lifestyle. :oops: Any diet tips most welcome.
good to meet you.
Kim
 

Anitram

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Hi, Kim. Welcome to the Forum.

If you've been told you're at risk of T2 then you will have had an HbA1c blood test result that places you in the pre-diabetes range (42-47). Fortunately those diagnosed pre-diabetic (or at risk of diabetes, if you like) have an opportunity to avoid progressing to a diagnosis of T2 diabetes by making some simple lifestyle changes. These involve diet, exercise and weight loss but if you're already slim and active that just leaves diet.

People often assume that the problem is too much sugary stuff like sweets, chocolate, cakes, biscuits, soft drinks etc but it's carbohydrates in general that T2s can't handle (things like rice, pasta, bread, potatoes) so whilst it would be wise to cut out the sweet stuff, cutting back on carbohydrates in general will help. In your case this might only require a reduction in portion sizes.

Do you know what your HbA1c result was, and can you tell us what your healthy diet consists of?

Martin
 

Annemarie

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
@Kimbo welcome! I’m not the one to give advice (but you’ll find many who are very knowledgeable) it sounds to me as if you already have an excellent lifestyle. Good luck
 

Ditto

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Hello and welcome. :)

My Mum ate really healthy too, a banana every morning, little bowl of prunes, bowl of 'healthy whole grains' (agh I hate that phrase) and just a small meal later at dinner. She gave up the drink years ago and never pigs out, will eat one sweetie and leave it at that (how do peoples do that?) and she's now pre-diabetic, so I dunno. What do you eat then? We have a menu thread in case you are interested?
 

everydayupsanddowns

Administrator
Staff member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Hello
I’ve just had my blood tests results back and was shocked to hear that I’m at risk of type 2 diabetes. I’m slim active and have a relatively healthy diet/lifestyle. :oops: Any diet tips most welcome.
good to meet you.
Kim
Welcome to the forum @Kimbo

Sorry to hear about your raised BG levels.

Do you know what your results were? (mostly those being told they are at increased risk of diabetes will have had an elevated HbA1c result).

It is perfectly possible to develop T2 diabetes while at a normal weight - I think something like 20% of cases are normal weight or underweight at diagnosis, or may be TOFI ‘this outside, fat inside’ where visceral fat builds up around the organs while a person carries little extra weight elsewhere.

Hiwever it may also be important for you to be aware over the coming months that there can be a rather ‘automatic’ classification of people with T2 largely driven by their age, whereas T1 can develop at any age (50% of T1s are diagnosed in adulthood), and a variant LADA occurs later in life and while autoimmune may closely resemble T2 to begin with.

I would suggest adjusting your diet to gently moderate or reduce your carbohydrate intake (all carbs not just ‘of which sugars’) to give your metabolism the best chance of managing your blood glucose levels, but also to keep an eye on things, especially if your BG begins to rise and you start losing weight over the next year or so.

Good luck with it, and let us know how you get on :)
 

Kimbo

New Member
Relationship to Diabetes
At risk of diabetes
Thanks everyone for your advice.. I’ve discovered that my blood count is 45.
kim
 

Anitram

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Thanks everyone for your advice.. I’ve discovered that my blood count is 45.
kim
I'd be surprised if you can't get that back below 42 with some simple dietary changes, such as cutting out sweet things and having smaller portions of things like rice, pasta, bread and potatoes.

Keep us posted on how you're doing.

Martin
 

rebrascora

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Hi and welcome from me too

A healthy diet for a non-diabetic person is not always healthy once your body starts to struggle with high glucose levels.
Things like breakfast cereals including porridge and fruit and wholemeal bread and pasta and brown rice and sweet or ordinary potatoes, even lentils and beans can cause us problems because they are all high in carbohydrate and our digestive system breaks them down into glucose which is absorbed into our blood stream. Not saying that you should no longer eat these foods but to reduce frequency and portion size as well as cutting right back on the obvious sweet stuff like cakes and biscuits and sweets. If you don't need to lose any weight then eating more fat will help to provide an alternative source of energy and keep you from feeling hungry. Most of us find that full fat Greek natural yoghurt is a staple on our shopping list and cheese and butter and cream and avocados and eggs as well as lots of greens like cabbage and broccoli and spinach and salad and cauliflower is a really versatile low carb veg as it can be grated and used as rice or couscous substitute or cooked and mashed with a dollop of cream cheese and a teaspoon of mustard as a mashed potato alternative....works great on a cottage pie with plenty of grated cheese of course and probably equally well on a fish pie.

I start every day with a cup of coffee made with cream (which is lower carb than milk) and find it is hard to feel badly done to having such a luxury first thing even though there are many things that I used to enjoy which I have given up to help me manage my Blood Glucose levels. Finding new low carb foods to treat myself with has been part of being successful with changing my diet.... after all this is a change for life, rather than a short term diet and food is an enjoyable part of life.

As Martin suggested, if you want to give us an idea of the sort of things you currently eat on an average day for breakfast, lunch and dinner we can perhaps suggest swaps or alternatives which would be more BG friendly.
Breakfast is one area which can make a significant difference because many people are more insulin resistant in the morning, so having a low carb breakfast can make more impact on your levels than changing any other meal, particularly if you currently eat breakfast cereal/porridge or toast and marmalade etc.

An HbA1c of just 45 means that small dietary changes should see you back to normal levels soon, so hopefully you will manage to turn the tide and avoid a full diabetes diagnosis with a little effort. Good luck.
 
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