Newbie type 2

Bazzlejet

Active Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Hi all, the day before yesterday i was diagnosed with Type 2. I was given Metformin and Gliclazide tablets to take and a Tee2 testing machine. After reading the booklets on how to use the machine and how to take a test I did my first one this morning.

Currently researching as much as i can regarding diet and exercise, which is how i stumbled across this forum. Wow, what a wealth of information and personal experiences, thanks so much to every one who contributes.
 

Docb

Moderator
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Hi @Bazzlejet and welcome to the forum. Have a good read around the forum and come back with any questions you might have.

How did you come to be diagnosed and did you get given a HbA1c result? Hba1c is the result from a blood test and it is used to diagnose diabetes. 48 is the diagnosis level but I suspect yours was a bit above that because you have been prescribed gliclazide.
 

rebrascora

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Hi and welcome from me too.

Sounds like you are wanting to take control since you are actively researching which is great news and the forum will certainly help you with that. We are always keen to support others who want to take an active part in managing their diabetes and it is a condition which is very much about self management because we have to live with it day after day and meal after meal.

As @Docb says, it is helpful if you are able to share a little more info about your diagnosis... ie How it came about (symptomatic or routine blood test), HbA1c result, as that gives us an idea of where on the diabetic scale you are and perhaps an idea of your BMI and fitness levels, so that we can advise accordingly.

Whilst I appreciate that they have started you on two lots of medication, cutting your carb intake is more effective than almost any other medication except perhaps injecting insulin, but with taking Gliclazide you have to do it carefully, because that particular drug stimulates your pancreas to produce extra insulin and it is a balancing act between carbs you eat and insulin to help remove the glucose they break down into. It may be possible to slowly reduce your carbs to the point that you don't need the medication anymore but if you do it too rapidly, the medication can take your levels too low. It is also not good for the small delicate blood vessels, particularly those in your eyes to reduce levels too quickly as they can get damaged, so a slow and steady reduction is a good safe plan and regular daily exercise like a brisk walk if you can manage it.

Good luck and feel free to ask anything that pops into your head. We all know how overwhelming the first few days/weeks are as there is an awful lot to get your head around.

Oh and if you would like to get to know us a bit better, there is a thread called "Group 7-day waking average" where many of us check in each morning with out morning fasting reading and exchange a bit of chat about our plans for the day and perhaps have a bit of banter. Don't feel obliged to read the thread from the beginning, just jump in today or tomorrow with your reading and you will soon get the hang of it and get to know us.
(1) Group 7-day waking average? | Page 3349 | Diabetes UK ....This is it if you fancy it. Hope to see you there...
 

Bazzlejet

Active Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Hi @Bazzlejet and welcome to the forum. Have a good read around the forum and come back with any questions you might have.

How did you come to be diagnosed and did you get given a HbA1c result? Hba1c is the result from a blood test and it is used to diagnose diabetes. 48 is the diagnosis level but I suspect yours was a bit above that because you have been prescribed gliclazide.
Thanks for the welcome @Docb. Basically it started with me getting up during the night for a wee (now in my 50's, I never get up during the night for a wee) and being thirsty.... a lot. Over a couple of weeks I was drinking more and emptying my bladder a lot, so i knew something wasn't right. I contacted the doctors, had the tests and received a phone call that i was Type 2 and told to pick up my medication and tester yesterday.

I wasn't given any results or numbers, so unfortunately i cant provide them. I took a measurement this morning before my breakfast, which was 15.5. My second test 10 mins ago was 24.0. I know these are not great, but i'm determined to get them down.
 

Bazzlejet

Active Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Hi and welcome from me too.

Sounds like you are wanting to take control since you are actively researching which is great news and the forum will certainly help you with that. We are always keen to support others who want to take an active part in managing their diabetes and it is a condition which is very much about self management because we have to live with it day after day and meal after meal.

As @Docb says, it is helpful if you are able to share a little more info about your diagnosis... ie How it came about (symptomatic or routine blood test), HbA1c result, as that gives us an idea of where on the diabetic scale you are and perhaps an idea of your BMI and fitness levels, so that we can advise accordingly.

Whilst I appreciate that they have started you on two lots of medication, cutting your carb intake is more effective than almost any other medication except perhaps injecting insulin, but with taking Gliclazide you have to do it carefully, because that particular drug stimulates your pancreas to produce extra insulin and it is a balancing act between carbs you eat and insulin to help remove the glucose they break down into. It may be possible to slowly reduce your carbs to the point that you don't need the medication anymore but if you do it too rapidly, the medication can take your levels too low. It is also not good for the small delicate blood vessels, particularly those in your eyes to reduce levels too quickly as they can get damaged, so a slow and steady reduction is a good safe plan and regular daily exercise like a brisk walk if you can manage it.

Good luck and feel free to ask anything that pops into your head. We all know how overwhelming the first few days/weeks are as there is an awful lot to get your head around.

Oh and if you would like to get to know us a bit better, there is a thread called "Group 7-day waking average" where many of us check in each morning with out morning fasting reading and exchange a bit of chat about our plans for the day and perhaps have a bit of banter. Don't feel obliged to read the thread from the beginning, just jump in today or tomorrow with your reading and you will soon get the hang of it and get to know us.
(1) Group 7-day waking average? | Page 3349 | Diabetes UK ....This is it if you fancy it. Hope to see you there...
Hi @rebrascora and thanks for the welcome.

Wow, thats great information and really good to know. My diagnosis was as above, although i forgot to mention that rapid weight loss was also a sign something is wrong.

Fitness wise i play rugby (although not since Covid !) and to be honest, with work and no rugby i've pretty much become a couch potato, not good i know :-(

However, this is obviously the kick up the backside i needed to get me off the couch and becoming more active again. Hopefully when the rugby starts up in earnest again i will have some idea on how to manage it.
 

Ralph-YK

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Welcome to the forum Bazzlejet from a fellow T2.
I wasn't given any results or numbers, so unfortunately i cant provide them. I took a measurement this morning before my breakfast, which was 15.5. My second test 10 mins ago was 24.0. I know these are not great, but i'm determined to get them down.
Yes, that is high. However, not a surprise for someone who's just been diagnoses.
I'd suggest keeping a record of your levels, along with a food diary. That way, after a couple of weeks, you can start looking for patterns.
 

Bazzlejet

Active Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Welcome to the forum Bazzlejet from a fellow T2.

Yes, that is high. However, not a surprise for someone who's just been diagnoses.
I'd suggest keeping a record of your levels, along with a food diary. That way, after a couple of weeks, you can start looking for patterns.
Thanks @Ralph-YK , thats reassuring, especially as the highest number on my chart was 15.1 :eek:
My tester came with a little log book, so i've added my entries so far. Good suggestion regarding the food diary, so i've started that too, ty.
 

Docb

Moderator
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Bazzlejet, worth asking for your HbA1c result next time you are talking to your surgery. Many of it use it to get a feel for where we are on the diabetes spectrum and changes in the value over time give you a good idea of whether things are heading in the right direction (or not!).
 

rebrascora

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Just as something more to research.... your sudden onset symptoms, weight loss and thirst and trips to the toilet together with your general fitness although I appreciate you may have lost some of that in the past year point more towards Type 1 than Type 2 diabetes where people tend to be more likely to put on weight pre diagnosis.
Also, you want to be asking for test results and make a note of them, so that you know how you are doing. As you can see, BG levels can rise and fall quite dramatically but the HbA1c test which is used to diagnose diabetes is sort of (but not exactly) an average of your BG levels over the past 3months ish so that is going to give you a better idea of your progress than individual BG readings.
Your sudden onset symptoms and very high levels are similar to my diagnosis 2 years ago aged 55. I managed to get them down into single figures by cutting out all bread, pasta, potatoes, rice, couscous, fruit and lastly my morning porridge as well as all the obvious, cakes, biscuits and sweets etc. and eating low fat, low salt and no alcohol.... it was hard work and unsustainable and I was started on insulin the following week and tested for Type 1 a couple of months later after I saw the consultant.

Drink plenty of water when your levels are that high as that will help to flush the surplus glucose out through your kidneys.
Avoid fruit juice or any sugary drinks and keep fruit intake (in all its forms ie fresh, dried, smoothies etc) low. A few berries are usually your best choice for fruit as they are the lowest carb and you get a good kick of flavour for a small portion... best to avoid the more exotic fruits like bananas and pineapples and mangoes etc as they are higher in sugar.

Have they given you a means of testing for ketones? Some urine dip strips perhaps. If not, ask for some as with readings regularly in the teens and above, you should be testing for ketones as you may be at risk of Diabetic Ketoacidosis
which is a very serious life threatening complication of high BG levels. "Ketostix" can be bought over the counter at most pharmacies for £5 if your GP/nurse won't give you any on prescription, but it is important to keep you safe.
 

Anitram

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
If you drive I believe that Gliclazide is one of the medications that requires you to notify the DVLA about your diabetes. Others will be better informed than me on this and can confirm or otherwise.

Your insurer needs to know too.

Martin
 

everydayupsanddowns

Administrator
Staff member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Welcome to the forum @Bazzlejet

Sorry to hear about your diagnosis. I hope you get some clarity and extra information and support from your clinic over the coming months. It will be interesting to see if your T2 is confirmed, or if further questions are asked and your classification is changed (you wouldn’t be the first on the forum!)

A food diary and some before/after meal BG checks might really help you to begin to bring your levels down, though as others have said you need to be slightly cautious about lowering carbs because of the gliclazide you are taking. Carefully does it :)
 

Bazzlejet

Active Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Bazzlejet, worth asking for your HbA1c result next time you are talking to your surgery. Many of it use it to get a feel for where we are on the diabetes spectrum and changes in the value over time give you a good idea of whether things are heading in the right direction (or not!).
Thanks for the advice, I will phone them today (has to be after 11am) and ask for my results.
 

Bazzlejet

Active Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Just as something more to research.... your sudden onset symptoms, weight loss and thirst and trips to the toilet together with your general fitness although I appreciate you may have lost some of that in the past year point more towards Type 1 than Type 2 diabetes where people tend to be more likely to put on weight pre diagnosis.
Also, you want to be asking for test results and make a note of them, so that you know how you are doing. As you can see, BG levels can rise and fall quite dramatically but the HbA1c test which is used to diagnose diabetes is sort of (but not exactly) an average of your BG levels over the past 3months ish so that is going to give you a better idea of your progress than individual BG readings.
Your sudden onset symptoms and very high levels are similar to my diagnosis 2 years ago aged 55. I managed to get them down into single figures by cutting out all bread, pasta, potatoes, rice, couscous, fruit and lastly my morning porridge as well as all the obvious, cakes, biscuits and sweets etc. and eating low fat, low salt and no alcohol.... it was hard work and unsustainable and I was started on insulin the following week and tested for Type 1 a couple of months later after I saw the consultant.

Drink plenty of water when your levels are that high as that will help to flush the surplus glucose out through your kidneys.
Avoid fruit juice or any sugary drinks and keep fruit intake (in all its forms ie fresh, dried, smoothies etc) low. A few berries are usually your best choice for fruit as they are the lowest carb and you get a good kick of flavour for a small portion... best to avoid the more exotic fruits like bananas and pineapples and mangoes etc as they are higher in sugar.

Have they given you a means of testing for ketones? Some urine dip strips perhaps. If not, ask for some as with readings regularly in the teens and above, you should be testing for ketones as you may be at risk of Diabetic Ketoacidosis
which is a very serious life threatening complication of high BG levels. "Ketostix" can be bought over the counter at most pharmacies for £5 if your GP/nurse won't give you any on prescription, but it is important to keep you safe.
This is a little worrying, but glass half full and all that.

I dont drink tea or coffee and only really drink water, sometimes i have a cordial (rarely) so hopefully i'm flushing my kidneys through ok.

Had no idea about Keytones, so i will get some Ketostix today. Thanks ever so much for pointing this out, much appreciated.
 

Bazzlejet

Active Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
If you drive I believe that Gliclazide is one of the medications that requires you to notify the DVLA about your diabetes. Others will be better informed than me on this and can confirm or otherwise.

Your insurer needs to know too.

Martin
Thanks for this @Anitram, i just did a quick search and the Govt website states my doctor should tell me if my medication needs me to inform the DVLA.... to be honest, my doctor hasnt actually told me much !

Not sure how reliable this site is (Yourdiabetes - DVLA), but it states that for driving a car or motorcycle there is not need to inform the DVLA for Gliclazide.

I'll give my insurers a call today. Thanks for the advice btw.
 

Bazzlejet

Active Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Welcome to the forum @Bazzlejet

Sorry to hear about your diagnosis. I hope you get some clarity and extra information and support from your clinic over the coming months. It will be interesting to see if your T2 is confirmed, or if further questions are asked and your classification is changed (you wouldn’t be the first on the forum!)

A food diary and some before/after meal BG checks might really help you to begin to bring your levels down, though as others have said you need to be slightly cautious about lowering carbs because of the gliclazide you are taking. Carefully does it :)
Thanks for the welcome @everydayupsanddowns

Started my food diary yesterday and carried out readings before and after all my meals. Definitely being cautious regarding carbs, thanks to the advice from @rebrascora.

To be honest as far as support goes - when i was diagnosed, i was just told to pick the medication and tester up, and to book another blood test (HbA1c) in a month. That was it, so finding this forum has been invaluable!
 

rebrascora

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Sadly diabetes management advice is not great at local GP practice level at the best of times, but during the current challenging circumstances, it is poorer still.
It is good that they are checking your blood again in a month. Usually it is 3 months as it takes that long for all the red blood cells to have been replaced and therefore see the full extent of the progress you have made, but since your BG levels are running so high, a recheck in a month at least suggests they are concerned.

Good that you are cutting carbs and hopefully seeing some reduction in levels as a result of that.
Testing for ketones should be done when your levels are 14 or above and if ketone levels start to rise above 1 you should seek advice.
Ketones are not supposed to occur in people with Type 2 which may be why they didn't give you any Ketostix but my gut feeling is that your situation is similar to mine and you may well be Type 1. I was prescribed them and I had a weekly call from my Diabetes nurse at the practice to discuss my results and answer any queries. She was in contact with the Diabetes clinic and the DSNs and consultant there and there were case conferences about me during that first month/6 weeks which was reassuring to know that my situation was being reviewed, but there are different protocols in different areas and some are more switched on with diabetes than others.
 

Anitram

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Thanks for this @Anitram, i just did a quick search and the Govt website states my doctor should tell me if my medication needs me to inform the DVLA.... to be honest, my doctor hasnt actually told me much !
I believe that changes though if taking gliclazide ever results in you having a hypo.

My insurer said they would make a note on my file but otherwise didn't seem that concerned and my premiums were unaffected. I wrote on my documents the date I informed them so I knew I'd done it.

Martin
 

Docb

Moderator
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
OK, that's a bit high. It's a bit higher than most get on diagnosis but nowhere near the forum record and it explains why you were put on gliclazide from the start. On the bright side, it looks as if your surgery is taking things seriously so there is only one way to go, and that is downward!
 

trophywench

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
The DVLA do have rules about testing your BG before driving though, which is exactly why when prescribing the Glic your GP also prescribed a BG testing meter and plenty of test strips.

PS if any of us have a hypo at the wheel and have an accident, then get taken to court because of the consequences thereof the charge is driving under the influence of drugs and if local papers still have Court reporters all your neighnours will know, and some will assume you were a drug addict. All good fun!
 
Top