Newbie saying hello and with an HbA1c questions

Largesse1!

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
I was diagnosed a couple of months ago. My BG and HbA1c levels were really high but since I've been on Metformin and Gliclozide the BS has come done. How long does it usually take for HbA1c levels to come down to normal (I tested at 138!) and can it impact the keto diet? ie I'm doing Keto and taking lots of exercise but not losing weight? Your experience and advise most welcome.
 

leonS

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
It rather depends on what you mean by "down".

The test measures how much glucose is stuck to your blood cells. When your BG is high rather more clucose gets stuck. As blood cells get replaced all the time and the replacments have no glucose stuck to them the answer could be as soon as you reduce your BG, but they are not all repalaced at once of course so that old cells with large amounts of glucose will influance the test result.

The life of a blood cell is about three months, so that the full effect of your reduction in BG levels will not be seen for three months, so the answer could be three months.

The test gives what is known as a moving average. As the more recent BG levels have more effect on the result than earlier ones it is actually a weighted moving average.

As the test only give a medic a rough idea of what control has been like it is usual to test not more frequently than every three months.

As it is a just a test it does not impact on anything.
 

Largesse1!

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Thanks very much for taking the time to reply so helpfully. My original question should, I now see, have been broken down into two parts.

The first you have answered - thank you.

The second is that if you have glucose 'stuck' to blood cells, will the body use this for energy before it uses fat for energy? ie is the glucose 'stuck' to the cells an energy source in addition to being a marker for the HbA1c tests (a separate and different question). If the body does use the glucose stuck to cells then it would have an impact on the keto diet, however, from your reply, it would seem that the glucose isn't used but, rather, dies off with the cell. In which case it can't be a contributory factor to weight loss on keto (if the stuck glucose is not available as an energy source).
 

leonS

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
The glucose binds very tightly to the cells so has no impact on energy production. The cells are broken down and recycled and the materials are reused when cells are not fit for further use rather than die. Some cell remain good for longer than others (like bank notes). The average life is about three months.
 

ColinUK

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Keto is certainly going to have a positive impact on your BG and therefore on your HbA1C over time.
 

Anitram

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
I was diagnosed a couple of months ago. My BG and HbA1c levels were really high but since I've been on Metformin and Gliclozide the BS has come done. How long does it usually take for HbA1c levels to come down to normal (I tested at 138!) and can it impact the keto diet? ie I'm doing Keto and taking lots of exercise but not losing weight? Your experience and advise most welcome.
When I was diagnosed my HbA1c was 114 but by switching to a LCHF diet, exercising more and losing weight it was back in the normal range 5 months later (but on just, at 41) and I've managed to keep it below pre-diabetic level since. That doesn't mean that the answer to your question is 5 months because we're all different and that's only what I managed, plus I didn't have so far to go as you.

What I found helpful was testing first thing in the morning and also two hours after our evening meal and recording the results in a spreadsheet. When I had enough readings I inserted a graph showing the 7-day moving averages for fasting and post-prandial, and this showed me that by BG was on a downward trend and that what I was doing was working. I'm still doing it and now have sixteen months' data. My moving average started at 9.2 and is at 5.4 as of today.

I did statistics at college and have worked in data analysis so once I had a set of numbers I was in my element.

Martin
 

LucyDUK

Administrator
Staff member
Relationship to Diabetes
Parent
Hi @Largesse1!

Welcome to the forum.

How quickly your HbA1c can reduce is very individual and depends on many things - but increased exercise should certainly help. Is the keto diet a new thing for you or were you following it pre-diagnosis?
 

Largesse1!

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Hi Lucy,

It's a new thing. I was diagnosed after two blood tests but haven't had a consult at the clinic yet. I started by cutting out sugar and refined flour, then lowering carbs and now keto. Alongside the medication the effect has been amazing and for two weeks now my blood sugars are between 4-7 (they were up at 19 when diagnosed) so the diet is definitely helping. I also want to lose weight and keto seems to do the trick for many folk so that's why I'm trying that.
 

grovesy

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Have you been referred to the hospital as most Type 2 Diabetics don't get hospital care.
 

Largesse1!

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
When I was diagnosed my HbA1c was 114 but by switching to a LCHF diet, exercising more and losing weight it was back in the normal range 5 months later (but on just, at 41) and I've managed to keep it below pre-diabetic level since. That doesn't mean that the answer to your question is 5 months because we're all different and that's only what I managed, plus I didn't have so far to go as you.

What I found helpful was testing first thing in the morning and also two hours after our evening meal and recording the results in a spreadsheet. When I had enough readings I inserted a graph showing the 7-day moving averages for fasting and post-prandial, and this showed me that by BG was on a downward trend and that what I was doing was working. I'm still doing it and now have sixteen months' data. My moving average started at 9.2 and is at 5.4 as of today.

I did statistics at college and have worked in data analysis so once I had a set of numbers I was in my element.

Martin
Thanks Martin, that's really helpful. I'll hope that I can do similar.

My BG monitor uploads to Diasend and does all those calculations for me. I've attached the trend graph here and it seems to be on a downward trend so far.
 

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LucyDUK

Administrator
Staff member
Relationship to Diabetes
Parent
Hi Lucy,

It's a new thing. I was diagnosed after two blood tests but haven't had a consult at the clinic yet. I started by cutting out sugar and refined flour, then lowering carbs and now keto. Alongside the medication the effect has been amazing and for two weeks now my blood sugars are between 4-7 (they were up at 19 when diagnosed) so the diet is definitely helping. I also want to lose weight and keto seems to do the trick for many folk so that's why I'm trying that.
I would be amazed if you don’t see a noticeable improvement in your HbA1c at the next one - whether or not they are ‘normal’ they’ll definitely be on their way. How have you found adapting to the new diet?
 

Anitram

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Thanks Martin, that's really helpful. I'll hope that I can do similar.

My BG monitor uploads to Diasend and does all those calculations for me. I've attached the trend graph here and it seems to be on a downward trend so far.
You can see a trend more clearly with a line graph. Does your device give you that option?

Martin
 

trophywench

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Those BG results look excellent so far! Do you have to have another HbA1c test before the hospital appointment? In any event, the Diasend data will prove very useful to the clinic so try and make sure you are able to access it to show them when you get there - OR!! - try ringing them to see if they can access Diasend because if so, I believe you can share your results with them before you get there then all of you already know what's happening and it saves time for everybody.
 

Martin9

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
When I was diagnosed my HbA1c was 114 but by switching to a LCHF diet, exercising more and losing weight it was back in the normal range 5 months later (but on just, at 41) and I've managed to keep it below pre-diabetic level since. That doesn't mean that the answer to your question is 5 months because we're all different and that's only what I managed, plus I didn't have so far to go as you.

What I found helpful was testing first thing in the morning and also two hours after our evening meal and recording the results in a spreadsheet. When I had enough readings I inserted a graph showing the 7-day moving averages for fasting and post-prandial, and this showed me that by BG was on a downward trend and that what I was doing was working. I'm still doing it and now have sixteen months' data. My moving average started at 9.2 and is at 5.4 as of today.

I did statistics at college and have worked in data analysis so once I had a set of numbers I was in my element.

Martin
I was one of those reeling at my diagnosis around 2 yrs ago, from the advice from this site.
, my Hba1c has been 35 and under since diagnosis , so to anyone that needs help plz listen to advice here xx
 

Largesse1!

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Those BG results look excellent so far! Do you have to have another HbA1c test before the hospital appointment? In any event, the Diasend data will prove very useful to the clinic so try and make sure you are able to access it to show them when you get there - OR!! - try ringing them to see if they can access Diasend because if so, I believe you can share your results with them before you get there then all of you already know what's happening and it saves time for everybody.
Thanks! Yes, I have tested the Diasend with my clinic and it works so I'll update before my appointment. They told me to arrange an HbA1c blood test with the GP before my appointment with them so I'm leaving it as long as possible so I can get the most up to date info.
 

Largesse1!

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
I would be amazed if you don’t see a noticeable improvement in your HbA1c at the next one - whether or not they are ‘normal’ they’ll definitely be on their way. How have you found adapting to the new diet?
I've found it quite easy to give up refined sugar, which surprised me, but keep making mistakes with natural sugars. I was eating berries without realising blueberries were high. And other snacks. I just snacked on some cashews and then looked them up - should have looked before I ate them, doh - and found they are 22. It'll take practice, that's for sure. But there's lots to love on it.
 

ianf0ster

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Hi Largesse1! ,
First I didn't notice anybody warning you about going Keto while taking Gliclazide.
You need to monitor your Blood Glucose regularly and to avoid it going too low! Because people on Glic , or on Insulin and some other drugs can suffer from hypos. This is where you BG gets so low that you may faint or even lose consciousness. So it is important to have a quick source of glucose with you ready to take if that happens.

Type 1 diabetics have to deal with this their whole lives.

Secondly, diet 9or more specifically how few carbs you eat) has a much bigger effect on your BG levels than any medication (apart from Insulin). Exercise is a poor third.
 
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