New

Emma L

New Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Hi All, I have just been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. I am stunned and trying to figure out how best to manage this. I am worried about how to manage this at work and am keen to get safely back to exercise.
 

Docb

Moderator
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Hi @Emma L and welcome to the forum. I’m a T2 myself so not qualified to help but we have loads of members who have been exactly where you are now and are living near normal lives having got their brain around it. They will be along soon to help get you on track.
 
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adrian1der

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Hi @Emma L and welcome. Like @Docb I'm T2 but as he says there will be plenty of T1 along shortly.
 

trophywench

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Hi @Emma L - welcome indeed to the club no-one wanted to join but know what? We have some very nice members, the vast majority of whom are very happy to answer queries when they can whether from new people like you or daft old bats like me - so my very first bit advice is when you don't know something you need to know - and when you 'just wonder if ... ' - then always ASK. Before forums existed and nobody much had access to the interwebnet thingy, we couldn't ask as and when. Now - we all can - so ask, ask, ask !

My turn first though - how did your diagnosis come about, and exactly how new is it? What insulins have you been started off on and how are you getting on with them? Have you been given telephone access to hospital DSNs and/or clinics - where have they left you? Have you been given a blood ketone testing meter and strips?

Have you been recommended any reading matter?

Phew - over to you!
 

SB2015

Forum Host
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Hi @Emma L from another T1

I was a late starter (aged 53 at diagnosis) and new absolutely nothing about it at the time. It is a steep learning curve but there is plenty of help available on here, and it really does just become part of your new ‘normal’ life. It is a manageable condition and doesn’t need to prevent you from doing things, but it does take a bit more planning and organisation. So work will be fine but give yourself a bit of time to get sorted first.

As @trophywench has said, do ask any questions that you have. Nothing is considered silly on here. Just ask away. It will help us to tailor our responses if you are happy to let us know what insulins yoU are using, and what support you already have available. If you have access to the Diabetes Specialist Nurse (DSN) at the hospital don’t worry about ‘pestering’ them. Th y will know that things take a bit of getting used to.

Take things step by step. Learn as much as you can about carbs. You will eventually need to be counting these, and you will be amazed at how knowledgeable you become. ( Name a biscuit, I can probably tell you the carbs - too many meetings with temptation in sight). An app a lot of people find useful is Carbs and Cals which might be worth downloading.

Keep in touch.
 

Emma L

New Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Hi @Emma L - welcome indeed to the club no-one wanted to join but know what? We have some very nice members, the vast majority of whom are very happy to answer queries when they can whether from new people like you or daft old bats like me - so my very first bit advice is when you don't know something you need to know - and when you 'just wonder if ... ' - then always ASK. Before forums existed and nobody much had access to the interwebnet thingy, we couldn't ask as and when. Now - we all can - so ask, ask, ask !

My turn first though - how did your diagnosis come about, and exactly how new is it? What insulins have you been started off on and how are you getting on with them? Have you been given telephone access to hospital DSNs and/or clinics - where have they left you? Have you been given a blood ketone testing meter and strips?

Have you been recommended any reading matter?

Phew - over to you!
Hi, thanks for the reply - I have been a massive learning curve. Diagnosed- 2 weeks ago. I presented to A&E ketotic and dehydrated. (in hind sight- all the signs were there- fatigue, thirst, infection- I just made excuses for the symptoms- have been busy at work). On levimer twice a day and novorapid with meals- been markedly reduced over the 2 weeks- am now on Levimer once a day and novorapid with meals. Community diabetic nurses have been great, saw a dietician today. Thanks for reminding me- I need to get more keto strips.
Have been reading some on line resources. Today the dietician has given me some reading material on getting back to exercise
 

Emma L

New Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Hi @Emma L from another T1

I was a late starter (aged 53 at diagnosis) and new absolutely nothing about it at the time. It is a steep learning curve but there is plenty of help available on here, and it really does just become part of your new ‘normal’ life. It is a manageable condition and doesn’t need to prevent you from doing things, but it does take a bit more planning and organisation. So work will be fine but give yourself a bit of time to get sorted first.

As @trophywench has said, do ask any questions that you have. Nothing is considered silly on here. Just ask away. It will help us to tailor our responses if you are happy to let us know what insulins yoU are using, and what support you already have available. If you have access to the Diabetes Specialist Nurse (DSN) at the hospital don’t worry about ‘pestering’ them. Th y will know that things take a bit of getting used to.

Take things step by step. Learn as much as you can about carbs. You will eventually need to be counting these, and you will be amazed at how knowledgeable you become. ( Name a biscuit, I can probably tell you the carbs - too many meetings with temptation in sight). An app a lot of people find useful is Carbs and Cals which might be worth downloading.

Keep in touch.
Thanks, I am 45 and this diagnosis was out the blue. It is really nice to talk to others who have managed this- as it feels like a lot to take in.
 

trophywench

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Has this book been recommended?

Type 1 Diabetes in Children, Adolescents and Young Adults Seventh Edition: Amazon.co.uk: Ragnar Hanas: 9781859597989: Books

Yes I know you aren't in that age group - but it's brilliant for ANY newly diagnosed Type 1 and really does start at the very beginning and because it's written for normal ordinary people it isn't written in what I call 'medicalese' where you have to find out what every other word means before you can start to understand the sentences.

It's also been useful when you're 60-odd and your DSN is trying to get something you might not have considered, over to you!

Non nova sed nove!
 

trophywench

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
PS in case you don't have your Collins Little Gem Latin-English dictionary to immediate hand - Not new but in a new way - eg two people can explain exactly the same thing, but you can only grasp what one of them said.
 

Emma L

New Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Has this book been recommended?

Type 1 Diabetes in Children, Adolescents and Young Adults Seventh Edition: Amazon.co.uk: Ragnar Hanas: 9781859597989: Books

Yes I know you aren't in that age group - but it's brilliant for ANY newly diagnosed Type 1 and really does start at the very beginning and because it's written for normal ordinary people it isn't written in what I call 'medicalese' where you have to find out what every other word means before you can start to understand the sentences.

It's also been useful when you're 60-odd and your DSN is trying to get something you might not have considered, over to you!

Non nova sed nove!
thanks- have ordered it
 

Bruce Stephens

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
thanks- have ordered it
The first thread in this topic has a bunch of useful links, including books, online resources, etc.

 

everydayupsanddowns

Administrator
Staff member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Welcome to the forum @Emma L

Sorry to hear about your diagnosis, and glad you have found us.

T1 can be frustrating to live with, it can be fickle, hilarious, and occasionally well behaved and reliable, but on the whole diabetes is manageable, and it shouldn’t stop you from doing anything you want to do. With a little preparation and some lateral thinking you can take on any challenge that you would have before.

With modern treatment options, monitoring tech and insulins near-normal BGs are tantalisingly possible for an increasing amount of the time, and some of at tech can now actively help your diabetes management and even make adjustments while you sleep!

Keep asking questions, and let us know how you are getting on.

What sort of exercise do you enjoy? We have a few sporty types who may be able to offer you some hints and tips.
 

Amity Island

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Hi All, I have just been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. I am stunned and trying to figure out how best to manage this. I am worried about how to manage this at work and am keen to get safely back to exercise.
Hi Emma,

Nice to "meet" you!

This is a great place for the curious diabetic!....and it's free!

Keeping this as short as possible for you, here are just a few things I can think of that are worth keeping to the back your mind, which will hopefully be of help.

1. INSULIN TERMINOLOGY
"Basal" Insulin (e.g Levemir) and "Bolus" Insulin (e.g Novorapid).

Basal Insulin is often taken with an insulin pen, once (or twice) a day to keep background blood sugars ticking over steady. In theory, background blood sugar should be level (not rising or droppng) and the same 24hrs a day. The hospital will help you work this dose out.

Bolus Insulin is usually taken before each and every meal or snack to "use up" the carbs (and to an extent, proteins and fats too) from a meal. This is on a very individual need, again hospital (and you) will help you adjust this over time.

NOTE: By using a combination (trying to replicate the pancreas) of both basal insulin and bolus insulin each day, the aim is to keep blood sugars in range as much of the time as possible.

2. BLOOD SUGAR RANGE
"Ideally" blood sugar should remain between 4 and 10mmol each and every day. It's not always that easy, but will likely become easier to achieve with practice and time. The average of one's blood sugar is given by (typically) a 6 monthly or yearly blood test and is given as a HbA1c.

3. BLOOD SUGAR SPIKES
These can be a challenge to prevent and are best avoided if at all possible. These can often be avoided with careful timing of meal time (Bolus) insulin. Sometimes, particularly in the morning for me, I have to take my breakfast bolus insulin 20mins before I eat to avoid a spike up in blood sugar. Best to try and keep blood sugars in range.

4. INSULIN RATIOS AND INSULIN SENSITIVITY
Many T1's carb count and many diabetics find they are more insulin resistant upon waking. This usually means more insulin is needed for carbs in the morning than for carbs later in the day. For example, I will require more insulin for the same meal in the morning as I will for that same meal if eaten in the evening. My current ratios are 2 units of bolus insulin for every 10g worth of carbs upon waking (typically 8units for 40g of carbs at breakfast), 1.5 units of bolus insulin for every 10g of carbs at lunch and 1:10g for tea. Most ready made food has the carbs written on the label, harder to work out when eating out, but just practice and research.

5. DAWN PHENOMENON
Many diabetics get a rise in blood sugar upon waking (not every day; it can be random). I usually add in an extra unit of bolus insulin with my breakfast to help counteract this.

6. HYPO's
What some don't realise is, it can take more than one lot of glucose tablets or jelly babies to treat a hypo (low blood sugar (below 4mmol). One dose can usually work if the hypo has been brought on by sudden unplanned exercise, but if it's caused by too much insulin (over estimating bolus), it can take many more attempts to keep blood sugar within range. Generally, we are advised to wait 15mins after first intake of glucose before taking more glucose, need to check blood sugar regularly after a hypo.

7. EXERCISE
Heavy and moderate exercise usually affects insulin sensitivity. Insulin ratios and basal insulin doses can be affected for anything up to 48hrs, depending on the individuals response. Exercise and T1 need to be carefully managed, but nothing stops me from exercising, just got to take it slow and steady and build some experience using blood tests and adjustments.

8. FREESTYLE LIBRE
Absolutley fantastic. Finger prickless glucose monitor worn on the arm which gives 24hr readouts! Brilliant, fantastic, amazing, superb.
 
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SB2015

Forum Host
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Hi Emma
You have had loads of advice and some suggested reading.
How are you doing now. I hope that things are settling down for you.
Are the injections getting easier?
Has your clinic been in touch to make any adjustment that you might need?
 
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