My garden/ river birds.

trophywench

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A couple of years ago we stayed on a campsite in October-ish where there were red kites, who quite happily landed to have a chat in gangs during the day and they're noisy and leave lots of deposits. Beautiful on the wing, but ...... :eek: best to wear a hat ........
 

nonethewiser

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We had woodpecker in garden last year on holly tree trunk, had to take it out so don't think bird will return, plenty of birds on feeders in front & back gardens but not sure what they all are, not great in recognising bird species, that's wife's enjoyment.
 

eggyg

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I’ve had a finch fest this evening! Standing at kitchen worktop preparing a salad for our tea and I glanced up and spotted a male bullfinch. We’ve lived here 34 years and I don’t recall seeing a one in the garden. I then abandoned the salad and stood at French doors with my camera. In 20 minutes, as well as the bullfinch. I had goldfinches, chaffinches, green finches and siskins. They all mix well together. I’ve had to fill the sunflower heart feeders up again! They’re going through two a day!
 

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adrian1der

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Goldfinches seem to have had a good year last year as we have lots in the garden. I love the collective nouns which, if I remember correctly, is a charm of goldfinches.
 

eggyg

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Goldfinches seem to have had a good year last year as we have lots in the garden. I love the collective nouns which, if I remember correctly, is a charm of goldfinches.
It is. They are gorgeous birds, we’ve never had as many as we’ve had this year. I’m watching them now. Beautiful.
 

Robin

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Oh for goodness sake, there’s a fledgling blackbird on the fence. What were its parents thinking a) producing it so early in the year and b) parking it on the fence fully exposed to the local sparrowhawk?
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Ditto

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That is just too cute! I want to squash it close. :D
 

trophywench

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@Ditto - aaarrrgghh in truth - but at the same time, yeah, definitely know what you mean and why you said that ! :)
 

Robin

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Oh no! Hope they come back for him soon!
It disappeared while my back was turned, and I didn’t hear any commotion, so hopefully it flittered back into next door’s evergreen, where I suspect the nest is. I’m sure it’s fledged too soon, it’s wings and tail looked really stumpy, with no proper feathers on. It happens every year, we see a fledgling blackbird or two really early on, then never see them again, then a month later the adults produce a second brood and have more success with it.
 

Robin

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Oh no! Hope they come back for him soon!
Good news, I’ve just seen a mummy blackbird with two babies in attendance, in the back garden. One is quite independent, and despite the stubby appearance, flew off into a bush when it realised parent had taken flight. The other one, however, sat around on the lawn looking gormless...
 

eggyg

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On our epic 13 mile walk yesterday, I only captured a couple of birds. Think it was too cold for them ! One was a first for me though. A beautiful little willow warbler with a beautiful singing voice. I had to confirm it’s ID with my bird watching FB group as I never can tell the difference between a chiffchaff and a willow warbler. The second one was a female goosander. Until last year I’d never come across goosanders, this year every water way I pass there’s a group of them. I don’t mind as I think they are lovely.
 

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Robin

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as I never can tell the difference between a chiffchaff and a willow warbler.
I need them to line up next to each other, and they will never oblige. My only hope is if they open their beaks and make a noise. We had a garden warbler ( in the garden, unsurprisingly!) yesterday, we saw it about a week ago but weren’t sure of its identity, but it was back and posing long enough to be identified this time. We quite often see one in early Spring, then never see it again for the rest of the season, they obviously pause for a rest and then move on to a more appealing garden.
 

Clumsypenguin86

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I also love birds and taking photos
 

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Ditto

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I never really see any birds, apart from the wood pigeons who are nesting in the hawthorn tree. They usually nest in the Silver Birch but have had a change this year. What's the difference between wood and ordinary pigeons?

Something is eating my eggs, would it be another bird?
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Robin

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I never really see any birds, apart from the wood pigeons who are nesting in the hawthorn tree. They usually nest in the Silver Birch but have had a change this year. What's the difference between wood and ordinary pigeons?

Something is eating my eggs, would it be another bird?
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Quite a few birds, Magpies especially, will raid other birds' nests and eat their eggs, so they probably see your box of eggs as a nice nest full.
 

trophywench

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Magpie is my first guess too, nasty wotsits they are and much more likely in an urban environment than eg jays.
 

SB2015

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Magpies picked on the nests of our blackbirds twice last year.
We found some very sad little things living under our pergola.
The magpies are big bullies.

I am pleased to see the blackbirds have chosen better nesting sites this year.
We also have residents in the Bird box we put up for blue tits.
 
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