Long-term culture of human pancreatic slices reveals regeneration of beta cells

Northerner

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Scientists from the Diabetes Research Institute (DRI) at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine have developed a method allowing for the long-term culture of "pancreatic slices" to study the regeneration of the human pancreas in real time. The results, published this week in the journal of Nature Communications, demonstrate for the first time that extended cultures of near-intact human pancreatic tissue retain the ability of the live organ to replenish insulin-producing beta cells. The use of this system as a model to study pancreatic regeneration could have important therapeutic implications for the treatment of diabetes.

 

trophywench

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..... and prescribe immuno suppressant drugs to the people too, so that any passing infection wafting by them in eg Tescos, or even (heaven forfend) Fortnum & Mason, lands them back in hospital. Unless the immune system is suppressed, surely it'll attack the new beta cells exactly as it did the original ones?
 

everydayupsanddowns

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I saw Prof John Pickup talking about this probably a decade ago. plus the Joslin 60/70/80 year medallists who still have a little insulin production and antibodies (in T1s where all the beta cells get splatted the antibodies disappear in time)

I was fascinated by the idea that for some, if you can only stop the ongoing destruction, then there’s a chance that more inbuilt insulin production might be recoverable in time.
 

Inka

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Type 1
...in T1s where all the beta cells get splatted the antibodies disappear in time).

@everydayupsanddowns Is there any rule about how long after diagnosis the antibodies disappear? Do you know the average length of time? I ask because I still have antibodies and I’ve no idea whether this is good or bad. I’ve had Type 1 for coming on for 30 years.

So does this mean I still have a few beta cells which my ‘helpful’ (not!) immune system is merrily killing?
 

everydayupsanddowns

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So does this mean I still have a few beta cells which my ‘helpful’ (not!) immune system is merrily killing?
that is my simple understanding. I think many T1s (especially those Dx in adulthood) seem to retain a small amount of endogenous insulin production. Still having antibodies would suggest remaining beta cells to me - but it’s a bit above my pay grade as a topic really!
 

grovesy

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Type 2
that is my simple understanding. I think many T1s (especially those Dx in adulthood) seem to retain a small amount of endogenous insulin production. Still having antibodies would suggest remaining beta cells to me - but it’s a bit above my pay grade as a topic really!
Was there not a recent piece of research saying this!
 

trophywench

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Type 1
The Joslin Institute (Boston, Massachusetts) have been doing such testing on their 'Golden Oldies' for a good many years. A guy with the forum name Richard 157 (or was it 147 ..) used to tell us about it, he was DX as a small child (pre school ISTR) and he was insulin free by the time he was well over 70, however I don't recall anything informing us if the ones diagnosed when they were older than him all had them or not, only that some did and some didn't without any possible reasons. Joslin have always been blooming good at disseminating their findings widely so I'm inclined to think they haven't found anything linking the participants that do or don't.
 
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