1. Welcome to the Diabetes UK Forum
    Dismiss Notice

Long Acting Insulin

Discussion in 'General Messageboard' started by Diageezer, Aug 15, 2019 at 11:13 PM.

  1. Diageezer

    Diageezer New Member

    Relationship to Diabetes:
    Type 1
    Hi everyone,
    Was diagnosed in March of this year so very much in the honey moon period.

    I have cut my short acting insulin down since diagnosis due to eating fewer carbs and exercising more regular.

    Since getting my libre I have noticed I am going low during the night, and have had to cut out long acting insulin which I was only taking at night. Are there any risks to this which I’ve not pre emptied apart from continue to monitor the impact it has on my night time levels as well as my reaction to the food I eat during the day?

    I have heard that laying on your sensor does have an effect but I did set my alarm during the night to test it with the finger prick and it was a little low at points.
     
  2. Diageezer

    Diageezer New Member

    Relationship to Diabetes:
    Type 1
    Thanks for your reply!

    I was prescribed Levemir and novorapid.
    I’ll give the nurses a shout today to let them know.
    I’ll just keep injecting for meals and keeping an eye on it. Woke up again this morning with no long acting and it’s steady eddie’d around 5 all night.
     
    Benny G and everydayupsanddowns like this.
  3. everydayupsanddowns

    everydayupsanddowns Moderator

    Relationship to Diabetes:
    Type 1
    One member here @Northerner found after initially needing quite a lot of basal insulin but that his basal needs gradually reduced until he didn’t need to take any. He suspects that he still has some islet cells functioning, but his doctors are rather surprised!

    Keep your clinic up to date, and keep an eye on your levels - if it is a bit of a bounce-back from your pancreas getting supported by injected insulin, you may find that you need to recommence basal at some stage if you lose more beta-cell mass - but diabetes is notoriously fickle and plays by its own rules!
     
    SB2015 likes this.
  4. SB2015

    SB2015 Well-Known Member

    Relationship to Diabetes:
    Type 1
    Welcome to the forum @Diageezer

    The honeymoon period is very unpredictable, and inconsistent,
    so as others have said regular checking is important, and don’t be surprised if your insulin needs change, both up and down in a somewhat unpredictable way.
     
  5. Kaylz

    Kaylz Well-Known Member

    Relationship to Diabetes:
    Type 1
    All you can do is keep an eye on those levels

    I was prescribed Tresiba as my basal and put on 8 units when I left the hospital in November 2016 which was far too much and I was experiencing lows all the time with it, gradually I reduced it down to 1 unit and was fine and happy there up until the end of last year when my honeymoon period came to a rather abrupt end lol
    xx
     
  6. Northerner

    Northerner Admin (Retired)

    Relationship to Diabetes:
    Type 1
    Hi @Diageezer, welcome to the forum :) As @everydayupsanddowns mentions, I initially required 20 units of Lantus per night as basal insulin. For me it stayed around 15 units after some initial adjustments, but then after about 4 years I found I needed to start reducing it very often. Eventually, I reached zero and have been there for the past 7 years :eek: There's a theory that after the initial shock to your body at diagnosis, your pancreas can recover slightly after being 'supported' for a while on injected insulin. This can continue for some time and is, as you rightly identify, the 'honeymoon' phase. I've encountered about half a dozen people on the forum over the years, however, who have reduced basal then found they no longer need it. I've recently had a C-peptide test done which shows I am producing a 'reasonable' amount of insulin (not entirely sure what that means!) and there is a possiblity that I am not a 'true' Type 1 but something called MODY, which is related to specific genes rather than being autoimmune - it's quite rare, but possible that the others who I mentioned are also this rare type. Haven't had it confirmed yet, a special genetic test will be required.

    In your situation there is no drawback to not needing basal insulin, you just need to monitor things carefully and be especially careful if you become ill at all, as you may need it then.
     
    SB2015 likes this.
  7. khskel

    khskel Well-Known Member

    Relationship to Diabetes:
    Type 1
    I had a few months where my basal requirements were zero, back to 12 now.
     
  8. KARNAK

    KARNAK Well-Known Member

    Relationship to Diabetes:
    Type 1
  9. TheClockworkDodo

    TheClockworkDodo Well-Known Member

    Relationship to Diabetes:
    Type 1
    Hello @Diageezer and welcome to the forum :)

    I was put on 16 units of basal when I came out of hospital after diagnosis, and after a week of getting up and eating a jam sandwich every night because I'd woken up so hypo, they told me to cut it to 6 units. Nine years later, I'm currently on 4.5 units and wondering whether I really need it at all - I've suspected for a while that I am going the same way as Northerner. At the moment I snack every evening to stop myself hypo-ing in the night, but it's possible that if I cut the bedtime snack I could cut out my basal altogether. I suspect if I did so I might need to raise my bolus doses for meals, and you might find the same (or you might not - we are all different!).

    Apparently they discovered recently that there is a small subset of type 1s who do continue to produce a tiny amount of their own insulin, and I suspect I'm in that group - you may be too, or you may just be in the Honeymoon period and suddenly find you need basal again later on. So far as insulin needs are concerned there is no right or wrong, you just need as much as you need.
     
    SB2015 likes this.

Share This Page