Information for you if DVLA have refused to renew your licence

Merlin.Kernow

New Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
I would like to share my story regarding the DVLA and Diabetes. I am a type 1 diabetic since 1976 and I passed my test in 1984. I had never had an accident and in April 2019 the DVLA refused to renew my licence because of a failed eyesight test at Specsavers. I took the Goldmann test and this again did not pass the standard required. This was very strange as I have not had any problems with my vision since2005 and 2007 when I had major eye surgery undertaken as a preventative measure against deteriorating eyesight. I was able to prove via 3 opthalmologists (1 private funded by myself) that my eyesight had not changed since 2011. DVLA seemed to disagree and it was Diabetes UK who informed me that I could be considered as an exceptional case. I undertook a driving safety check which involved a 45 minute drive and I was assessed by two people in the car. Strangely enough, I also had to undertake memory tests and strength tests to prove I was strong and did not suffer from mental impairment, which although I passed at 100%, seemed odd. I regained my licence in September 2019 after losing six months and thousands of pounds lost in income. Although I appealed against DVLA (I am happy to supply details of the appeals process to anyone who wants to know), I was awarded a small sum of money. I would like to point out that this was not paid as compensation, but as a token towards my lost income. DVLA do not seem to pay "compensation" for poor service, rather they pay money for lost income.
The moral of this story is to give hope to diabetics who may find themselves in this position. You may be able to be considered as an exceptional case even if the vision field test results are not as they should be. If you can prove that you have adapted to a limited field of vision and subject to other medical checks, you may get your licence bacl! Don't despair!
 

KARNAK

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Welcome to the forum @Merlin.Kernow.

An interesting story glad you got your licence back, yes DVLA can be very
difficult at times.
 

Drummer

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
I pity anyone relying on Specsavers.
I had glasses made there after an eyetest and they were lacking an essential part of the prescription, even though they claimed to have contacted my previous opticians to check that their assessment was correct.
 

daducky88

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
I pity anyone relying on Specsavers.
I had glasses made there after an eyetest and they were lacking an essential part of the prescription, even though they claimed to have contacted my previous opticians to check that their assessment was correct.
Vision express is much more human e.g. rebend glass frames into shape free while specsavers wont do.
 

Merlin.Kernow

New Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Hello all,
I would like to post some more detail regarding my dealings with DVLA as posted above to prepare anyone who is in the unfortunate position of having to challenge a DVLA decision to revoke a driving licence. Sometimes, of course, revocation is the correct decision medically however if you can medically challenge the DVLA decision, read on
. When I attended the local centre to take a "Driving safety check", I was met by two very nice and approachable members of staff who assessed me. I was, however extremely surprised that they made me take memory tests, asking me for 10 words beginning with "F" in 1 minute (I started with facetious!), agility tests and a strength test which involved me squeezing the lady's hand and trying to lift her off her chair firstly with one hand and then the other. The driving "test" was great fun as I love driving and i am happy to say I passed all tests at 100%.
The moral of this story is that DVLA will insist that you undertake as many tests as possible to try and justify their decision to cancel your licence. Bearing in mind that their original concern revolved around the field of vision, I feel that much of the assessment that I had to undertake was completely irrelevant. I did not feel it was worth while talking to DVLA about this however as there did not seem to be any one person in charge of my case and therefore I felt that although all but one of the staff were polite, it was like the proverbial "talking to a brick wall" and DVLA as a whole did not seem to understand, believe me or care at all.
 
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mikeyB

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
What you describe is actually part of the assessment for driving. It's that part of the test that takes loads of ancient folk being taken off the road, whether or not they have decent vision, so it could hardly be considered irrelevant to an assessment of fitness to drive. It's all part of the routine at local centres for "Driving Safety Checks", and performs a valuable function in keeping our roads safe. Such a test would, for example, have kept the Duke of Edinburgh off the road long before he had his accident.
 

Merlin.Kernow

New Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Thanks for your interest in my comments about the driving safety test that I was involved with. I agree, to a point, that this type of test could indeed be valuable in keeping unfit drivers off the road as you describe. Can you tell me why it is then, that this type of test is not mandatory for all drivers on a regular or semi regular basis? If it was, that would be fair.
 

Squirrel768

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
What a palaver! Shows how you have to fight for the correct outcome sometimes ... and wonder how many people will just accept it and give up?

Thankfully, just had mine renewed for another 3 years with no hassle, so grateful for small mercies (even thoug at the moment I'm hardly driving anywhere anyway!
 

Merlin.Kernow

New Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Well done. I didn't want to moan about DVLA but my post is meant to give hope and help to anyone else who is out there are needs some practical or moral support. I know I did when I seemed to be the only one who knew that I was still a safe driver. Like you say, can't drive anywhere now anyway!!
 

Clifton

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Vision express is much more human e.g. rebend glass frames into shape free while specsavers wont do.
Completely agree. Specsavers cost far more in the end I've found as their policies are best described as oppressive...
 

daducky88

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
I would like to share my story regarding the DVLA and Diabetes. I am a type 1 diabetic since 1976 and I passed my test in 1984. I had never had an accident and in April 2019 the DVLA refused to renew my licence because of a failed eyesight test at Specsavers. I took the Goldmann test and this again did not pass the standard required. This was very strange as I have not had any problems with my vision since2005 and 2007 when I had major eye surgery undertaken as a preventative measure against deteriorating eyesight. I was able to prove via 3 opthalmologists (1 private funded by myself) that my eyesight had not changed since 2011. DVLA seemed to disagree and it was Diabetes UK who informed me that I could be considered as an exceptional case. I undertook a driving safety check which involved a 45 minute drive and I was assessed by two people in the car. Strangely enough, I also had to undertake memory tests and strength tests to prove I was strong and did not suffer from mental impairment, which although I passed at 100%, seemed odd. I regained my licence in September 2019 after losing six months and thousands of pounds lost in income. Although I appealed against DVLA (I am happy to supply details of the appeals process to anyone who wants to know), I was awarded a small sum of money. I would like to point out that this was not paid as compensation, but as a token towards my lost income. DVLA do not seem to pay "compensation" for poor service, rather they pay money for lost income.
The moral of this story is to give hope to diabetics who may find themselves in this position. You may be able to be considered as an exceptional case even if the vision field test results are not as they should be. If you can prove that you have adapted to a limited field of vision and subject to other medical checks, you may get your licence bacl! Don't despair!


Hi Merlin

you've been the ringer I expected reading various comments to have to go through.
Personally I think a forum folder of How to... would be useful.
If you wrote a guide of process recommendations for license recovery that be sure be helpful I reckon.

I feel test results are likely to be affected by, in combination:

i) health
ii) test familiarity

Thus the first time one is subjected to a test, its a sort a process shock, it can a little while to gets one head into gear. There ought to be a few mins, say 2-3 mins practise before the real test is ran. I described what the test was like and what testees(the people being tested) had to do/ watch out for by response when I wrote up a note on this site on DVLA FOV testing.

Exclusion from driving is probably, I can only hypothesise as do not have data, being caused by a combination of the disease, DVLA medical advisor incapacity and policy of default to ban, a poorly discriminating FOV test between poor eyesight and low test familiarity, Government indifference.
 

mikeyB

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
You have a sophisticated way of declaring your complete ignorance by “presenting a hypothesis as you do not have data” that is totally adrift from reality, I’m afraid.

1. what do you mean by DVLA advisor incapacity? Or is that just a casual insult?

2. there is no default to ban. The medical advisers (who are fully trained in the law on driving) simply apply the laws and regulations.

3. The FOV test is simple and accurate. Interpretation of the test results includes consideration of any anomalous results, if the rest of the test is normal.

4. The government has nothing to do with it. They take advice from the DVLA regarding ability to drive.

And finally, if the health of the person undergoing the test is such that it can effect the result, how does that tally with driving? Just a thought.
 
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