I have known for a while but now it’s got serious , Don’t know where to start

Scottydogs

New Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
That’s it basically it l don’t know where to start I’m hopping that reading your bloggs etc will help me to understand carbs etc. I’m no youngster and l was diagnosed around a year ago with type 2 and I’m not going to lie but l didn’t take it in or even realise how bad it can get. My bloods are reading between 9 and 16.5 this morning is the start of getting to grips with things and shopping today will take ages probably as l don’t know where to start. Any advise will be appreciated. Love from scotty
 

Toucan

Forum Host
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Hello @Scottydogs and welcome to the forum.
Many of us here have faced similar situations to yourself, and although it will mean a few changes, there are good solutions that will let you find a way to controlling your blood sugars and learn to live with diabetes.
There is no 'one size fits all' though and you need to find out what works for you.

I take it that you have a blood sugar monitor which is good news as it will help you work out what foods most effect you blood sugars and arrive at an eating plan that is good for you. test-review-adjust gives more details on this.
A useful book is http://www.carbsandcals.com/thebook.html to find out about carb content of different foods.

What has worked for me is a low-carb diet, and I will list some of the things that have helped me -
As well as cutting out all sugary things I seriously reduce all starchy carbs - bread, pasta,rice, potatoes etc. Some people can eat some of these in moderation, your tester will tell you how much these effect you.
I eat lots of veg, which helps me feel full - but mainly the less starchy ones that grow above the ground.
Proteins are fine and help me feel full - but I avoid processed food.
Fruit also needs to be limited as it can be high in carb, I limit to one potion a day, usually berries.
I include lots of good fats - oily fish,olive oil,avaacado, nuts and a little cheese.

You will find lots of help on the forum, and please ask any questions.
The 'Learning Zone' tab at the top of this page is also a good information source.

Best wishes and I hope that you soon find a good solution that works for you.
 

zuludog

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Good morning SCOTTYDOGS and welcome to the Forum!

It's good to hear that you've decided to get a grip with your diabetes, but where to start?
Well, a simple biology lesson would be a good place

The simplest carbohydrate or sugar is glucose
If glucose molecules are joined together you get larger and more complex molecules, and if you join up enough of them you get starch, which is still a carbohydrate

When we eat carbs they are broken down in the gut back into glucose, which passes through the gut wall into the bloodstream, and from there into our cells for further use
The hormone insulin is produced by the pancreas and enables the glucose to cross the cell walls from the blood into the interior of the cells

Sometimes the pancreas does not produce enough insulin so the level of glucose in the blood increases, and it is this accumulation that causes the problems we call diabetes
We can control these problems to some extent by taking medication which tweaks the pancreas into making more insulin, or taking in insulin by injection
However, the best way to reduce the amount of glucose in the blood is not to eat the stuff in the first place
Once you've grasped that, all the changes & restrictions fall into place

As all carbs are converted into glucose this means we must stop or reduce our consumption of starchy food like bread, pasta spuds, breakfast cereals, & rice as well as obviously sweet things like cakes, biscuits, sweets & chocolate

Have a look through the Learning Zone (red/orange tab at the top of this page) and old Threads, especially Newcomers, there's a lot of information & advice in there and the chances are that any questions you might have will have been asked & answered before
But don't be embarrassed or nervous bout asking any of your own questions; we were all Newcomers once

Many people take the diagnosis of diabetes as the motivation to change a few things, like losing weight, more exercise, cutting out booze, fags, junk & processed food etc, and having more veg, good fats, and so on
Nothing in the body happens in isolation, and you may well find that things like blood pressure, cholesterol levels, weight, & general liveliness improve as well
 
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everydayupsanddowns

Administrator
Staff member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Welcome to the forum @Scottydogs

Really glad to hear that you have decided to tackle your diabetes head-on now, and folks here will be only too happy to share their experiences, tips and what works for them as you do.

Diabetes is a serious condition, but it’s also one that can usually be managed well with a few changes and adaptations - it’s something that you can learn to live well with, and it shouldn’t stop you doing things you enjoy. Try not to be disheartened about your diabetes. It’s not the had you are dealt, but how you play the cards that matters :)

In fact, many people on the forum later reflect that their diagnosis with diabetes was a good thing, that they hadn’t realised how generally under the weather they had been feeling... and that it became a catalyst which prompted them to make positive changes towards a healthier and more active life.

For a bit more background information, the ‘useful links’ thread is a mine of helpful information - useful-links-for-people-new-to-diabetes

Members here frequently recommend Maggie Davey’s Letter and Gretchen Becker’s book, as very helpful starting points.

Good luck, and let us know how you get on!
 

Anitram

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
That’s it basically it l don’t know where to start I’m hopping that reading your bloggs etc will help me to understand carbs etc. I’m no youngster and l was diagnosed around a year ago with type 2 and I’m not going to lie but l didn’t take it in or even realise how bad it can get. My bloods are reading between 9 and 16.5 this morning is the start of getting to grips with things and shopping today will take ages probably as l don’t know where to start. Any advise will be appreciated. Love from scotty
Hi, Scotty. Welcome to the Forum. It's good that you've decided that it's time to start taking your Type 2 seriously and we are all here to help. If you're happy to share some details, eg your HbA1c at diagnosis, when that was, any medication, this will help us understand where you are on your Diabetes journey.

You've already received some good advice on diet so all I will add is that I've found that I can manage my Diabetes through a strict Low Carb High Fat diet full of meat, fish, salads, green vegetables, low-carb fruit and wholegrain bread & cereal combined with daily exercise. I've also shed some lbs, which has also helped. I'm no youngster either but I feel fitter and healthier than I've felt in years.

Martin
 

Docb

Moderator
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Hello scottydogs and welcome. For a start, you are a youngster compared to some of us so don't do yourself down!

I am afraid that many people seem to be given a diagnosis with very little information or advice attached to it so it is good that you have come here to get clued up. There are countless years of experience on here so start asking questions.

As for shopping today, go about things as normal but start reading nutritional labels looking for the "total carbohydrate" content of what you are buying. If you have to make a choice about something then choose the one with the lower carbohydrate content. One exercise you can do is to check out tins of soup. You will be amazed at the differences in carbohydrate content of different soups or even different brands of the same soup.

Good that you have a meter which will give you quick feed back on what is happening to your blood glucose. Odd readings do not mean a lot. What you are looking for is patterns. So, in your shopping, get a notebook and start a diary noting down all the readings you take, date and time you take them, all your meals and when you ate them. It is good to take readings before and a couple of hours after a meal to see the effects of individual foodstuffs. When you have a few weeks of readings you will (with some help from us) begin to get some ideas about what is going on.

That's enough for starters!
 

leonS

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Hi
Are you on medication? If not it might ce an idea to talk to your GP if after a few weeks you can not get your BG down,
 
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