Hypo ? after evening meal

Sutherland53

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Can anyone please advise on the following, recently diagnosed with Type 2, about 2 months ago, prescribed Sukkarto 500 once daily. I normally take it with my evening meal and was having no problems, recently however I’ve been falling into a very, very deep sleep unintentionally, after my meal which is very worrisome, is this hypo? or can anybody offer an explanation.
Many thanks
 

Drummer

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
What is a typical evening meal for you?
 

Docb

Moderator
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Hi @Sutherland53.

Doubt if falling asleep after your meal is anything to do with a hypo. Your body is very good at preventing hypos and as a general rule you need to have excess insulin in your system to get one. It's a perennial problem for T1's because they inject insulin and need to take care that they do not inject too much, and it is theoretically possible to go hypo if you are taking a class of drugs that stimulate your pancreas to produce more insulin. Metformin, which is in Sukkarto 500, is not in that class so it will not induce a hypo.

I put my dropping off in the evening down to age - and I feel much better after it! If it is worrying you then speak to your GP to make sure there is nothing else going on.
 

Sutherland53

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Hi Docb, thanks for your response, it’s a relief to hear that it’s not a hypo ! being new to diabetes I have little knowledge and I just wondered why falling asleep, which is unusual for me was suddenly occurring, I am 72 now so perhaps a good meal, evening darkness, after a busy day would encourage sleep!!
 

Sutherland53

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
What is a typical evening meal for you?
Hi Drummer, I’ve been eating a fair diet of late, as recommended!! I normally have red meat, two veg and potato’s followed by a small sweet, then the next day I might have egg/bacon with bread/butter and generally alternate like that. I have 2 slices of whole meal toast in the morning, a sandwich of 2 slices of bread/filling around 2pm then tea time meal about 6 o clock.
 

Drummer

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Ah - if I are that I would be hyper, and asleep.
Bread is not a good choice, nor potatoes. Four slices of bread would exceed my total daily intake, and I am more insulin resistant in the mornings anyway.
Can you check your blood glucose levels?
Getting a meter which is cheap to run helped me a lot to determine both want to eat and when.
 

Bruce Stephens

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Since it's new and surprising to you, it's probably worth mentioning next time you see your GP (or other healthcare person) but I suspect there's nothing wrong. As others have said, a hypo is unlikely; hyper is a bit more likely and that can also make one feel sleepy.
 

Sutherland53

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Hi Bruce thanks for that response, I didn’t realise that hyper could also make you sleepy as well I don’t really eat much in the day so I’m supposing a big evening meal would cause a spike, add to that the fact that I love my carbs, potatoes and bread especially, and I’ll sneak a mini chocolate roll when passing through the kitchen!! I keep saying that I’ll stop buying those
 

Sutherland53

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Ah - if I are that I would be hyper, and asleep.
Bread is not a good choice, nor potatoes. Four slices of bread would exceed my total daily intake, and I am more insulin resistant in the mornings anyway.
Can you check your blood glucose levels?
Getting a meter which is cheap to run helped me a lot to determine both want to eat and when.
Hi Drummer I’ve always been a carb lover, a carboholic you might say and find it difficult to resist bread or potato although I have cut out the chips!! but I’ve been looking for some dietary advice that doesn’t involve foreign foods if possible and it’s so confusing trying to make a meal I can’t even spell!! bangers and mash appeals much more. If you have any recommendations for dietary recipes I’d be very interested
 

grovesy

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
I personally find that I tolerate carbs better in the middle of the day than in the evening.
 

Drummer

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
I buy low carb sausages - the Coop ones seem to be the best if they are fresh. Try cauliflower mash - you might well need to squash it a bit to press out the water before mashing it with cream. Swede and celeriac as also low carb options, but if you like a stir fry then sausages can be cooked with mushrooms, sweet pepper, courgette slices, etc, or you can get stir fry mixes frozen - I go to Lidl for mine. There are three variations, two are lower than the third, and they are easy to cook and tasty. They are labelled in foreign terms but they seem quite ordinary ingredients to me.
People have reacted well to my suggestion of cauliflower cheese - steam some cauliflower, place it in a warm dish, cover with cream cheese, sprinkle on anything herby or spicy you might fancy, cover with grated hard cheese, I like Red Leicester, maybe top with a blue cheese if you like it, then place in the warm oven and wait for it to become melty and just tinged with gold - then wait for it to cool down a bit before eating.
When I roast a chicken or a joint I cut slices of swede and put it in the tray then roast the bird on a rack over the top of it. The taste and texture of the swede is much improved as it slowly submerges in the drippings. Works with other meat too.
Low carb cooking is not complicated, in fact I think it is simpler than a lot of modern stuff.
 

Paulbreen

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Hi Sutherland53 It sounds like that’s a Hyper, You are like me, a potato lover, but you really need to take care of that especially as a T2
I would have 100g of potato in what ever style 4 evening meals per week, that’s around 20-25 grams of carbs depending how you cook them.
The bread is not helping you either, a slice of wholemeal bread is around 18-20 grams of depending on the brand.
you don’t have to cut the carbs out completely but you really need to reduce them heavily.
 

Sutherland53

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Hi Sutherland53 It sounds like that’s a Hyper, You are like me, a potato lover, but you really need to take care of that especially as a T2
I would have 100g of potato in what ever style 4 evening meals per week, that’s around 20-25 grams of carbs depending how you cook them.
The bread is not helping you either, a slice of wholemeal bread is around 18-20 grams of depending on the brand.
you don’t have to cut the carbs out completely but you really need to reduce them heavily.
 

Sutherland53

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Thanks for that info Paul it’s a real help, I thought that by switching to brown or seeded bread would be healthy, never realised the amount in them I need to take a long hard look at my carbs intake and make some definate changes
 

Sutherland53

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
I buy low carb sausages - the Coop ones seem to be the best if they are fresh. Try cauliflower mash - you might well need to squash it a bit to press out the water before mashing it with cream. Swede and celeriac as also low carb options, but if you like a stir fry then sausages can be cooked with mushrooms, sweet pepper, courgette slices, etc, or you can get stir fry mixes frozen - I go to Lidl for mine. There are three variations, two are lower than the third, and they are easy to cook and tasty. They are labelled in foreign terms but they seem quite ordinary ingredients to me.
People have reacted well to my suggestion of cauliflower cheese - steam some cauliflower, place it in a warm dish, cover with cream cheese, sprinkle on anything herby or spicy you might fancy, cover with grated hard cheese, I like Red Leicester, maybe top with a blue cheese if you like it, then place in the warm oven and wait for it to become melty and just tinged with gold - then wait for it to cool down a bit before eating.
When I roast a chicken or a joint I cut slices of swede and put it in the tray then roast the bird on a rack over the top of it. The taste and texture of the swede is much improved as it slowly submerges in the drippings. Works with other meat too.
Low carb cooking is not complicated, in fact I think it is simpler than a lot of modern stuff.
Brilliant Drummer thank you!! gonna give that cauliflower a definite try, sounds wonderful!!
 

Drummer

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
I just thought of another thing you might try.
Slice cabbage into discs about an inch thick and arrange on a tray, one each. Drizzle on some olive oil and then sprinkle lightly with black pepper, cook at a medium heat until softened. Serve as a base for meat - bacon or sausage, maybe with fried egg on top, or mince, steak or chop.
 

Sutherland53

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
I just thought of another thing you might try.
Slice cabbage into discs about an inch thick and arrange on a tray, one each. Drizzle on some olive oil and then sprinkle lightly with black pepper, cook at a medium heat until softened. Serve as a base for meat - bacon or sausage, maybe with fried egg on top, or mince, steak or chop.
Now that’s a definite one to try !! I love white cabbage and I’ve never thought about using it like that Drummer especially the fried egg on top !! thank you does how you cook food, fry, grill, etc make any difference to your levels ?
 

Bruce Stephens

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
thank you does how you cook food, fry, grill, etc make any difference to your levels ?
I believe not much. (There's an exception with at least some carbohydrates (rice, pasta, potatoes are usually mentioned): if you cook them, then allow them to cool, then (optionally) reheat them, then some of the starch becomes more resistant to digestion.)
 

Drummer

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Now that’s a definite one to try !! I love white cabbage and I’ve never thought about using it like that Drummer especially the fried egg on top !! thank you does how you cook food, fry, grill, etc make any difference to your levels ?
I don't think so - we can cope with fats and proteins so the only thing I grill is cheese on toast for himself, and that is in the halogen oven.
Actually - the way I make scrambled egg, with a bit of butter in the wok, is probably higher fat than frying them - as the butter is absorbed but the frying fat isn't.
The foods which can supposedly become resistant starch don't feature in my menus at all. I did do one experiment which showed no difference for me, but my gut is very efficient. I don't eat many peas or beans as I get results which seem to show I get twice the carbohydrate value from a given weight.
 
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