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Hello

Binfield

Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Hello all
Just a quick intro from me. Just recently diagnosed with Type 2 ,bit of a shock and still trying to come to terms with it all. Hopefully get a lot of help from this forum.
Binfield
 

trophywench

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Hi Tim
Do you remember what they said your blood test result was, and has your doc prescribed any medication and if so what? What led to your diagnosis - which is always a shock whoever and however old you are.
 

Binfield

Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
So i was diagnosed with T2 new years eve, got a call from GP after a blood test. Put straight onto Metformin and told i would be contacted by the GP for other tests. I went back for checks on my feet and that was it,next visit is March. I was given a little booklet and no other information. Since week 2 of my meds i have been getting light headed so called GP ,she changed meds to a slow release version and offered no other explanations. I have been left to find out information about T2 with no help from the GP. So where do i start? I have gone through a few threads and the main thing seems to be cut down the carbs, less sugar and start exercising. I feel like i have been abandoned .

Binfield
 

Binfield

Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Hi Tim
Do you remember what they said your blood test result was, and has your doc prescribed any medication and if so what? What led to your diagnosis - which is always a shock whoever and however old you are.
I was not told my results, Put straight onto Metformin and kicked out the door :) . I was getting the usual thirst, peeing constantly , blared vision.

Binfield
 

Drummer

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Getting a test meter - I use a Spirit Healthcare Tee 2 - so you can see for yourself what sort of levels you get to after eating.
If you are racking up numbers in the teens then cutting down on carbohydrates should sort that out - sugar and starch (Yes, those healthy starchy foods) all end up as something we can't really cope with.
Swapping the high carb foods such as anything made from grain, potatoes, high sugar fruits, and eating lower carb foods could have you back in normal numbers pretty swiftly if you are a boring ordinary type two.
It might take a while for your eyesight to settle down - don't change your glasses for a while, if you wear them, you might find that you can suddenly lose weight, but eating meat, fish, cheese, eggs and low carb foods should sort you out, with any luck. If you find that the Metformin does wicked things then you can try slow release, but I found that I did not need the tablets - after 5 weeks of Hell thinking that they were something essential.
 

Drummer

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Pretty standard response, I'm afraid.
Your best bet is to get a test meter - and after stopping high carb foods substitute some lower carb ones, there are quite a few options for salad and veges which won't cause problems, and small servings of berries are usually tolerated. I eat lots of salad stuff, have stir fries and roasted veges along with protein and fat and have been in remission for some time now.
 
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Docb

Moderator
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Good morning @Binfield and welcome to the forum. I see you have a thread in the Newbies board so I will flag @everydayupsanddowns and ask him to merge the two so you get all the replies in one place.

As others have said, the support you get from GP's can be very variable and being sent away with a prescription and little information is not uncommon.

One thing you might do is to ring your surgery and ask for your HbA1c result. This is the result of the blood test which gave you the diagnosis. This is because diabetes in not an on/off condition. HbA1c is a measure of how your system has been controlling your blood glucose over the last few months. As a number it varies from about 30 to well over 100. 48 is considered a tipping point. If it is above 48, then it is considered that action needs to be taken and you are given the diagnosis. I'm assuming yours is above 48, both because you have been given a diagnosis and because of the symptoms you have described. When you have that number you can get an idea of how big is the hill you have to climb to get things back to normal.

Read around the forum and the learning zone and get to understand what diabetes is all about. Ask any questions on here and we will do our best to fill in the gaps. No question is considered too silly, after many of us have all been where you are now so know how confusing things can be.

Personally I would not be thinking of a meter just yet. It can be a very powerful tool when it comes to controlling blood sugar but its use needs to be part of an overall plan and that comes from getting to grips with your particular version of this thing we call diabetes.
 

everydayupsanddowns

Administrator
Staff member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Welcome to the forum @Binfield

Sorry to hear about your diagnosis.

I’ve merged your introductory threads as Doc suggested.

I can completely understand how you must feel rather abandoned - especially getting a diagnosis over New Year’s.

If you are hungry for more information and a bit of a background on T2 members here frequently recommend Maggie Davey’s Letter and Gretchen Becker’s book, as very helpful starting points.

Hope comparing experiences with others on the forum will help you to feel less alone and abandoned with your diagnosis.

Diabetes is a serious condition, but it’s also one that can usually be managed well with a few changes and adaptations - it’s something that you can learn to live well with, and it shouldn’t stop you doing things you enjoy. Try not to be disheartened about your diagnosis, many people on the forum later reflect that their diagnosis became a catalyst which prompted them to make positive changes towards a healthier and more active life

Keep asking questions, and let us know how you get on.
 
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