hello everyone

nicole

New Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
I have only just found this forum.I have had type 2 for 4 years now and my bgl is creeping up the last HbA1c was 8 so practice nurse has uped my metformin 500 from twice a day to three times. was told no sugar diet, come back in 3 months. Told to check blood levels when i feel unwell, and not on a regular basis.How often do you check yours? No sugar diet!!! this is fine until you look and see the amount of sugar in most foods. could anyone please tell me what amount of sugar i should be looking at when buying food. I have found most low-fat food has a high sugar content. Really need help now as i'm getting worried.
 
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Northerner

Admin (Retired)
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Hi Nicole, and welcome! I'm Type 1 so my experiences are different to some degree to yours, but there are lots of helpful Type 2 people here who I'm sure will offer their support and advice. Have you been referred to a dietician? If not, do request it from your dr. - seems a bit unfair to tell you to adjust your diet but not tell you how! I think 'no-sugar' is a bit of a misnomer, as sugar alone isn't responsible for rises in blood sugar, but all carbohydrate foods - you need to discover the types and quantities of these (bread, pasta, rice etc.) that you can eat without adverse effects. In order to find out this, you will probably need to test more initially, not less! There's something that is often recommended here called 'Jennifer's advice' -worth taking a look at. http://www.diabetes-support.org.uk/joomla/jennifers-advice

Arm yourself with info and ask questions here, then return to your nurse and quiz her! Oh, and I think 3 months is far too long to wait - you need answers now if you are going to improve things - I'd say the sooner the better, and I think the advice you were given is rather poor and unhelpful.
 
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mikep1979

Banned
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
hi nicole,

well i agree with northerner that 3 months is far to long to wait and would be looking to get myself a new appointment first off!!!!
with regards to the jennifers advice i wouldn't follow it personally as i have two family members who are type 2 and use a standard healthy diet including fish 2-3 times a week and they are having hba1c results regularly in the 5% marks. best thing to do is try and get in to see a dietician and follow what they tell you at first to see if it works for you. if not then see what they say. i find my diabetes team are always listening to the people they care for and coming up with great ideas.
 

Vanessa

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Hello Nicole - sorry to hear that your levels are creeping up and hope the increase in metformin is helpful. In the interim there are many things you can do - and even the Diabetes UK care statement on nutritional guidelines do not advocate a "no sugar" diet. As Northerner says it is the carbohydrates that are responsible and current official guidelines say we need lots of them although there are a significant number of Type 2s who follow a low or very low carbohydrate diet

Just checked the back of my porridge packet - guideline daily amounts for women: 2000kcals, 45g protein, 230g carbohydrate (of which sugars 90g), fat 70g (of which saturates 20g), fibre 24g, salt 6g. First place I started learning about my "diabetic" diet was the Diabetes UK supermarket tour part of their website - could play with it to see how what I ate/was planning fitted in to the official guidelines and get suggestions on how I could improve as well

Then, despite gliclazide and metformin, since Christmas I had found my daily monitoring levels were also creeping up although my diet was "healthy" - my weight had stuck as well even on about 1500-1600 calories a day. I didn't want to go down the low/very low carbohydrate route that some have found very successful as it really doesn't suit me or my lifestyle. I started reading around more extensively and paying more attention to what others were saying had worked for them on this forum - I also found "Jennifer's advice" helpful as I, like you, was getting worried - particularly as I have had some early eye changes and lots of exhortation to keep my blood glucose under good control as a result

I've posted elsewhere today ("why do we have to go to the USA" thread - apols but don't know how I link to it here) about following a low GI and moderate carb diet as well as increasing the exercise that appears to be working well for me. Also seen that Mike1979's Type 2 family members have had some success with it as well. Increasing the exercise has helped as well

As regards testing - I do vary but usually every morning and always before driving as I'm on gliclazide and that can lead to hyps. I also test if I try a new food or new form of exercise

You are also right when you talk about buying low fat food - often it is then given flavour by adding sugars to it and, for example, low fat biscuits will have just the same amount (if not more) carbs as the ordinary version and probably be more expensive. Anything more than 10% sugars per 100g is regarded as high sugar

Hope this helps. I will also add that every individual seems to vary in what affects them so there is a lot of trial and error in managing this challenge. NHS dieticians also seem to be rare beings so most Type 2's appear to get told things like "eat healthily" or "avoid sugars" and are then left to muddle through. Remember though - you are not alone in your confusion and worry - people here will share their experiences readily and then you can follow up on what is right for you

Welcome to one of the most helpful places I've found
 

nicole

New Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
thanks too the three of you, i feel better already. wish i had found this site years ago. so much good info back to reading a bit more thanks once again.
 
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