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Grandmother’s diets?

ianf0ster

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
I eat at 12 hourly intervals, and that is it.
We can usually store enough energy to face just about anything for several days and survive - so I can't see the logic in preparing to exercise by eating.
When I go out for the day I usually take something to drink, but that is all I need. It doesn't feel like I am doing anything unusual - but perhaps I am.
Yes you and I and all others who are 'fat adapted' these days are unusual. We wouldn't have been before the 1980's, but these days we are!
 

travellor

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Yes you and I and all others who are 'fat adapted' these days are unusual. We wouldn't have been before the 1980's, but these days we are!
Before bread and potatoes?
Rice puddings, bread puddings, angel delight, proper jelly, pasta, rice, cheese on toast, egg on toast, Frosties, Weetabix, Ricicles, fish fingers, fizzy sugary pop, Ribena, Cresta, tea with two sugars, they were the good old days .....
You must have been very well off if you could afford not to eat all these.
Not my sphere I'm afraid.
 
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travellor

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
I eat at 12 hourly intervals, and that is it.
We can usually store enough energy to face just about anything for several days and survive - so I can't see the logic in preparing to exercise by eating.
When I go out for the day I usually take something to drink, but that is all I need. It doesn't feel like I am doing anything unusual - but perhaps I am.

You're not,
I have no issue working all day, and not stopping.
Most people don't.
(Before I lost weight I probably had enough energy stored for a year)
However, I do try to stay hydrated.
 

ianf0ster

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Before bread and potatoes?
Rice puddings, bread puddings, angel delight, proper jelly, pasta, rice, cheese on toast, egg on toast, Frosties, Weetabix, Ricicles, fish fingers, fizzy sugary pop, Ribena, Cresta, tea with two sugars, they were the good old days .....
You must have been very well off if you could afford not to eat all these.
Not my sphere I'm afraid.
No, not well off. Sure we ate bread, but with dripping (or butter if we could afford it). We ate potato, but our protein always contained natural fat. Chicken was expensive so ate more beef, lamb, cheaper fattier cuts of pork. Common proteins were eggs, cheese and of course back then there was only full fat milk on your doorstep and at school.
 

travellor

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
No, not well off. Sure we ate bread, but with dripping (or butter if we could afford it). We ate potato, but our protein always contained natural fat. Chicken was expensive so ate more beef, lamb, cheaper fattier cuts of pork. Common proteins were eggs, cheese and of course back then there was only full fat milk on your doorstep and at school.
So, like everyone else, not low carb in any form?
Bread, potato, everything else.....
Carbs and fat?
Aren't the carbs supposed to stop fat adaption?
Or is there a way to have a diet with bread, and potatoes that it still works with?
 

ianf0ster

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
The total carbs that both the US and the UK ate back then was much lower than after the Low Fat idea was pushed at us.
That is why I say I have done 3 major ways of eating in my life.
Pre 1980's traditional balanced eating as eaten by my grandparents, my parent and me up into my 30's - this had very little factory food in it what there was was generally in 'treats', The Low Fat very High Carb (since no change in protein) with much more manufactured food, and lastly Low Carb 'medium , traditional' fats Higher Protein because of my CVD and Diabetes.
On first way of eating I stayed slim and apparently healthy
On the second I got fatter and sick
On the third I'm attempting to undo the damage done by the second one.
 

Drummer

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Before bread and potatoes?
Rice puddings, bread puddings, angel delight, proper jelly, pasta, rice, cheese on toast, egg on toast, Frosties, Weetabix, Ricicles, fish fingers, fizzy sugary pop, Ribena, Cresta, tea with two sugars, they were the good old days .....
You must have been very well off if you could afford not to eat all these.
Not my sphere I'm afraid.
We were not all that well off, but there were no Frosties, Weetabix or Riceicles, no angel delight nor pasta, no cheese nor egg on toast, no Ribena. We did have some fizzy drinks, but only a couple of bottles a week. Puddings were once a week only. Fish came from the chippie, also once a week, and a portion of chips was divided into three for us kids, and another portion between my parents.
That was in the 50s and 60s - I was 18 in 1969.
 

travellor

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
We were not all that well off, but there were no Frosties, Weetabix or Riceicles, no angel delight nor pasta, no cheese nor egg on toast, no Ribena. We did have some fizzy drinks, but only a couple of bottles a week. Puddings were once a week only. Fish came from the chippie, also once a week, and a portion of chips was divided into three for us kids, and another portion between my parents.
That was in the 50s and 60s - I was 18 in 1969.
Yes, I agree, very carby, but portion controlled by necessity.
That was the way of eating in those times.
No one was "fat adapted", we just didn't overeat, and no one refused any food no matter what it was.
 

Drummer

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Yes, I agree, very carby, but portion controlled by necessity.
That was the way of eating in those times.
No one was "fat adapted", we just didn't overeat, and no one refused any food no matter what it was.
No - that is not what I wrote.
Very low in carbs overall, portion control no - it depended on how hungry you were, and we knew our mother would go ballistic if we accepted food other than from family. We did not even eat our own food outside where people could see us - just not done.
 

travellor

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
No - that is not what I wrote.
Very low in carbs overall, portion control no - it depended on how hungry you were, and we knew our mother would go ballistic if we accepted food other than from family. We did not even eat our own food outside where people could see us - just not done.
Ok,
a couple of bottles a week of fizzy drinks, puddings were once a week only. Fish came from the chippie, also once a week, and a portion of chips was divided into three for us kids.
Well, I still eat fish and chips, and puddings, but to be honest I don't do full sugar fizzy drinks, but I regard the rest as carby.
What low carb food did you eat as the fillers?
Obviously not bread, (no sandwiches), not potatoes, not fruit, is there a cheap non carby filler?
I'm struggling to see a cheap diet that doesn't bulk up on these sorts of foods?
I'm assuming you didn't eat eggs and cheese and meat by itself?
No portion control, I'm struggling to understand you could eat until you were satiated as well, from what you have said?
I certainly wasn't allowed to raid the pantry, my portions came on the plate, regardless.
 

travellor

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
................By all means keep exercising, it will mean you become fitter, and more muscle can deal with more glucose, but it is a hard road to go when there is a far easier route you might take...........
Trust me, if I could get fitter, build muscles, improve my cardio vascular system, just by sitting on the sofa, watching Netflix, eating cheese, I'd be the first one there.
 

Drummer

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Trust me, if I could get fitter, build muscles, improve my cardio vascular system, just by sitting on the sofa, watching Netflix, eating cheese, I'd be the first one there.
I joined up for morris dancing, longsword and maypole - I have not actually sat on a sofa for some months, and I am not quite sure what Netflix might be....
It is a lot quieter on the folk music scene now as the last of the weekend dance outs is past, but practice season is upon us - I don't need a gym membership to be getting exercise, gadding about all over Dorset and beyond seems to do the trick, along with servicing knitting machines for a bit of money - they are heavy to move around, but it is getting easier again.
 

travellor

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
I joined up for morris dancing, longsword and maypole - I have not actually sat on a sofa for some months, and I am not quite sure what Netflix might be....
It is a lot quieter on the folk music scene now as the last of the weekend dance outs is past, but practice season is upon us - I don't need a gym membership to be getting exercise, gadding about all over Dorset and beyond seems to do the trick, along with servicing knitting machines for a bit of money - they are heavy to move around, but it is getting easier again.
Excellent result.
I'm a great believer in "move more, eat less"
(Although I have just finished lunch) so I'm not down to your two meals a day I must admit.
 

Drummer

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Excellent result.
I'm a great believer in "move more, eat less"
(Although I have just finished lunch) so I'm not down to your two meals a day I must admit.
Having been on a low calorie low fat high carb - all 'healthy' carbs - diet for some time before diagnosis it was definitely not a case of eating less.
In the days after diagnosis, having ordered a whole hogget (a well grown lamb) I ate beef and pork and chicken with stir fries and curries after the first two days, and I used the diet sheets to light the barbecue, and then I had sausages, eggs and bacon for breakfast. I did add a tomato but couldn't manage to eat it.
 

travellor

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Having been on a low calorie low fat high carb - all 'healthy' carbs - diet for some time before diagnosis it was definitely not a case of eating less.
In the days after diagnosis, having ordered a whole hogget (a well grown lamb) I ate beef and pork and chicken with stir fries and curries after the first two days, and I used the diet sheets to light the barbecue, and then I had sausages, eggs and bacon for breakfast. I did add a tomato but couldn't manage to eat it.
So you eat two very, very, large meals a day?
Your intake is in excess of 2000 calories a day, on a low carb diet?
No wonder you only eat twice a day!
You BBQ an entire lamb for yourself, but couldn't manage the tomato?
I'm not surprised to be fair.
But I am impressed.
You normally imply you aren't hungry, and have to force yourself to eat?
I don't eat anywhere near that much.
 

nonethewiser

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
The total carbs that both the US and the UK ate back then was much lower than after the Low Fat idea was pushed at us.

Back when?

Grew up in 60s & 70s, carbs where big part of diet, porridge weetabix toast were breakfast staples, dinner would be beans on toast sandwich bread & soup, bread would come uncut then sliced like doorsteps. Tea would be mince n tatties, shepherds cottage pie stews with root veg such like, always with potatoes, followed by pudding, examples sponge & custard homemade rice pudding or slice of homemade cake, similar meals at school except chips were mainly on offer or mashed tatties.

Every friday when father got paid it was chippy tea, we ate same way as parents did when little as mother learnt how to cook & bake from own mother.

All families our way ate similar meals, so diet was carb heavy as it was on red meat.
 

travellor

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Back when?

Grew up in 60s & 70s, carbs where big part of diet, porridge weetabix toast were breakfast staples, dinner would be beans on toast sandwich bread & soup, bread would come uncut then sliced like doorsteps. Tea would be mince n tatties, shepherds cottage pie stews with root veg such like, always with potatoes, followed by pudding, examples sponge & custard homemade rice pudding or slice of homemade cake, similar meals at school except chips were mainly on offer or mashed tatties.

Every friday when father got paid it was chippy tea, we ate same way as parents did when little as mother learnt how to cook & bake from own mother.

All families our way ate similar meals, so diet was carb heavy as it was on red meat.
Maybe nostalgia isn't what it used to be.
 

Drummer

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
So you eat two very, very, large meals a day?
Your intake is in excess of 2000 calories a day, on a low carb diet?
No wonder you only eat twice a day!
You BBQ an entire lamb for yourself, but couldn't manage the tomato?
I'm not surprised to be fair.
But I am impressed.
You normally imply you aren't hungry, and have to force yourself to eat?
I don't eat anywhere near that much.
Now you are just being silly or deliberately misreporting what I write - I eat a normal portion of meat or fish - along with low carb veges or salad.
I am never hungry, in the true sense of the word, but I never force myself to eat.
I did not barbecue any of the lamb, it doesn't barbecue well.
As I wrote - I ate beef and pork in the days after diagnosis - the hogget was delivered a couple of weeks later. I do miss that butcher.
 
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travellor

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Simple fact is you cant change history when people are still around who lived in it.
Well, my history seemed to be the same as yours.
I certainly didn't see any "low carb".
We didn't snack as much, and we exercised more running around outside.
I was thin then, I got fat later when I had more disposable income to spend, and sat around eating the snacks I spent it on.
I'm not blaming the world for it, I did it to myself. No one made me eat all that food.
In fact, the only thing I remember about that, and the NHS, was every time I saw my doctor, she told me I was putting on weight, and to eat less, and lose some.
Certainly not forced onto a diet that made me gain more!
 
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