Got my freebie Libre2 sensor...any tips things to do, things to avoid?

Peely66

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
So my freebie sensor arrived the other day and I wondered if any of you more experienced users of Libre had any top tips or things to avoid? I'm off work trying to use up my annual leave at the moment. I've not taken any since last March hoping I might be able to get away and visit friends if I took it later. The virus had other plans and I'm stuck at home trying to avoid all the household jobs that need doing. So I thought I'd wait until I was back at work till putting the sensor on so that I get an idea of how to use it when I'm back to my usual routine. Any thoughts?
 

nonethewiser

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Works same as 1, only difference being if you start 2 with phone with intentions to use app you can't use reader. Alarms are good so use them, both high & low glucose ones, turned off signal loss alarm as it was getting on nerves.
 

Ginny03

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
I'm an experienced user of Libre 1 - no exaggeration to say I've found it life changing! I'm 2 days into my first Libre 2 sensor, played with the alarm settings for the first time today. Have to say I'm very impressed.
A few things. If your sugars take a sudden plunge, it will phase out, saying 'reading unavailable, try again in 10 minutes'. It actually refused to come back for about 40 minutes. I've not had it go for that long with Libre 1 before, maybe 20 minutes at most (except for with a faulty sensor). I hope that won't be a regular occurrence, but think it might be, reading some reviews. We shall see!
I use the reader, but some people using their phone say that if you have a phone case with a magnetic clasp, it can prevent it from reading the sensor.
If you're completely new to Libre, don't worry too much about the sensors falling off, they are quite sturdy. The only time to be really careful is when you're in or just out of the shower. The only one I've ever lost early, I caught it on the shower screen as I got out Fortunately it only had a day or two left. Pat with your towel rather than rubbing at it and don't knock it until your skin is properly dry.
They are fab. I self fund. Worth every penny. Good luck!!
 

helli

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
My LIbre tip is to be aware of the limitations.
Too many people complain that it doesn't stay on or it is in accurate. Often (but not always) this is because they put it in the wrong place or they have too high expectations of the accuracy.

Placement -
back of the upper arm towards the under of the arm ON A FLAT and clean area. Might seem obvious but the inability of the sensor to bend caught me unawares at first and it peeled off.
I seem to have"Limpet skin" but some find their sensor can fall off even when they place it correctly. They use a plaster or tape to hold it in place.
And, be aware that it is there when walking through doors and getting dressed/undressed. Not sure whether it is relevant to you but bras are the arch-nemesis of Libre sesnors.

Accuracy -
- Sensors are least accurate for their first 24 to 48 hours (my first Libre 2 was inaccurate for its first 72 hours). If you can, attach the sensor for a couple of days before activating it to give your body time to get used to the alien object inserted into your arm.
- Libre is most accurate between 4 and 8mmol/l. Outside this range, the advice is to always test with a finger prick before correcting.
- Libre are subject to compression lows - if you apply pressure to the sensor, they will record low. THis is most likely whilst sleeping if you lie on it. If you see low readings during the night, don't panic. It may be a compression low. If it reoccurs, set an alarm and test with a finger prick.
- Libre is factory calibrated. Some people are just different to "Factory man" and find them very inaccurate. There are a number of phone apps such as Glimp and xDrip which use a slightly different algorithm which includes a calibration variable - you can calibrate your sensor against finger pricks.
- Some sensors are just faulty. Abbot is very good at replacing these if you PHONE them. Few people have experienced success with emails and online chat.

Hopefully, with this advice and more, you should be able to gather some very useful statistics about your blood sugars. If you have not used a CGM before, don't panic if you see your blood sugars rising more than you expected after meals. Use it as a learning experience - maybe bolus earlier. Having a Libre is a great time for a basal test, too.
 

Peely66

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Works same as 1, only difference being if you start 2 with phone with intentions to use app you can't use reader. Alarms are good so use them, both high & low glucose ones, turned off signal loss alarm as it was getting on nerves.
Many thanks and I'll bear the signal loss advice in mind.
 
Last edited:

Peely66

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
I'm an experienced user of Libre 1 - no exaggeration to say I've found it life changing! I'm 2 days into my first Libre 2 sensor, played with the alarm settings for the first time today. Have to say I'm very impressed.
A few things. If your sugars take a sudden plunge, it will phase out, saying 'reading unavailable, try again in 10 minutes'. It actually refused to come back for about 40 minutes. I've not had it go for that long with Libre 1 before, maybe 20 minutes at most (except for with a faulty sensor). I hope that won't be a regular occurrence, but think it might be, reading some reviews. We shall see!
I use the reader, but some people using their phone say that if you have a phone case with a magnetic clasp, it can prevent it from reading the sensor.
If you're completely new to Libre, don't worry too much about the sensors falling off, they are quite sturdy. The only time to be really careful is when you're in or just out of the shower. The only one I've ever lost early, I caught it on the shower screen as I got out Fortunately it only had a day or two left. Pat with your towel rather than rubbing at it and don't knock it until your skin is properly dry.
They are fab. I self fund. Worth every penny. Good luck!!
Thanks for your response. Especially the tip about the magnetic clasp. Not sure if that's something that's in the literature and the learning modules from Abbott but well worth watching out for. I don't think I'd be able to self fund full time. Two things I'm thinking are: 1) if I was able to fund for 6 months or possibly less,3 months perhaps, would it still be a useful exercise and provide me with data that would inform the rest of my days without a Libre? I guess that might be a case of suck it and see. 2) On the basis that I was able to improve my control significantly I could put together a case for funding.
 

Peely66

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
My LIbre tip is to be aware of the limitations.
Too many people complain that it doesn't stay on or it is in accurate. Often (but not always) this is because they put it in the wrong place or they have too high expectations of the accuracy.

Placement -
back of the upper arm towards the under of the arm ON A FLAT and clean area. Might seem obvious but the inability of the sensor to bend caught me unawares at first and it peeled off.
I seem to have"Limpet skin" but some find their sensor can fall off even when they place it correctly. They use a plaster or tape to hold it in place.
And, be aware that it is there when walking through doors and getting dressed/undressed. Not sure whether it is relevant to you but bras are the arch-nemesis of Libre sesnors.

Accuracy -
- Sensors are least accurate for their first 24 to 48 hours (my first Libre 2 was inaccurate for its first 72 hours). If you can, attach the sensor for a couple of days before activating it to give your body time to get used to the alien object inserted into your arm.
- Libre is most accurate between 4 and 8mmol/l. Outside this range, the advice is to always test with a finger prick before correcting.
- Libre are subject to compression lows - if you apply pressure to the sensor, they will record low. THis is most likely whilst sleeping if you lie on it. If you see low readings during the night, don't panic. It may be a compression low. If it reoccurs, set an alarm and test with a finger prick.
- Libre is factory calibrated. Some people are just different to "Factory man" and find them very inaccurate. There are a number of phone apps such as Glimp and xDrip which use a slightly different algorithm which includes a calibration variable - you can calibrate your sensor against finger pricks.
- Some sensors are just faulty. Abbot is very good at replacing these if you PHONE them. Few people have experienced success with emails and online chat.

Hopefully, with this advice and more, you should be able to gather some very useful statistics about your blood sugars. If you have not used a CGM before, don't panic if you see your blood sugars rising more than you expected after meals. Use it as a learning experience - maybe bolus earlier. Having a Libre is a great time for a basal test, too.
Thanks for that comprehensive reply. No more bras for me then...I'm male;) It's a shame that they only give you one sensor to try as I'm quite worried about completely cocking up either putting it on or keeping it on. Like you say I hope to gain some really interesting and useful data and that's why I've decided to wait till I'm back at work as my days at the moment are far from typical.
 

helli

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
@Peely66 hopefully, you can go bra free for the 2 weeks with the Libre. It shouldn't affect your blood sugars too much :D
You can wear as many bras as you want after that
 

everydayupsanddowns

Administrator
Staff member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
These videos from the Diabetes Technology Network cover some really useful ground - they are about Libre1, but much the same applies to Libre2. I contributed the ‘introductory‘ one :)

 

Peely66

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
These videos from the Diabetes Technology Network cover some really useful ground - they are about Libre1, but much the same applies to Libre2. I contributed the ‘introductory‘ one :)

Oh excellent stuff. Really comprehensive. Thanks Mike.

Neil
 

Spozkins

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
My LIbre tip is to be aware of the limitations.
Too many people complain that it doesn't stay on or it is in accurate. Often (but not always) this is because they put it in the wrong place or they have too high expectations of the accuracy.

Placement -
back of the upper arm towards the under of the arm ON A FLAT and clean area. Might seem obvious but the inability of the sensor to bend caught me unawares at first and it peeled off.
I seem to have"Limpet skin" but some find their sensor can fall off even when they place it correctly. They use a plaster or tape to hold it in place.
And, be aware that it is there when walking through doors and getting dressed/undressed. Not sure whether it is relevant to you but bras are the arch-nemesis of Libre sesnors.

Accuracy -
- Sensors are least accurate for their first 24 to 48 hours (my first Libre 2 was inaccurate for its first 72 hours). If you can, attach the sensor for a couple of days before activating it to give your body time to get used to the alien object inserted into your arm.
- Libre is most accurate between 4 and 8mmol/l. Outside this range, the advice is to always test with a finger prick before correcting.
- Libre are subject to compression lows - if you apply pressure to the sensor, they will record low. THis is most likely whilst sleeping if you lie on it. If you see low readings during the night, don't panic. It may be a compression low. If it reoccurs, set an alarm and test with a finger prick.
- Libre is factory calibrated. Some people are just different to "Factory man" and find them very inaccurate. There are a number of phone apps such as Glimp and xDrip which use a slightly different algorithm which includes a calibration variable - you can calibrate your sensor against finger pricks.
- Some sensors are just faulty. Abbot is very good at replacing these if you PHONE them. Few people have experienced success with emails and online chat.

Hopefully, with this advice and more, you should be able to gather some very useful statistics about your blood sugars. If you have not used a CGM before, don't panic if you see your blood sugars rising more than you expected after meals. Use it as a learning experience - maybe bolus earlier. Having a Libre is a great time for a basal test, too.
The nhs letter I was sent was that a finger prick was no longer needed due to the sensor being reliable.
 

Spozkins

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Thanks for that comprehensive reply. No more bras for me then...I'm male;) It's a shame that they only give you one sensor to try as I'm quite worried about completely cocking up either putting it on or keeping it on. Like you say I hope to gain some really interesting and useful data and that's why I've decided to wait till I'm back at work as my days at the moment are far from typical.
Just be careful. The very first one I wore came off via a door frame about 4 hours after use - but I never did it again!

If you wear it closer to the inside of the arm it's less likely to happen. Just be super aware and make a point to keep arms close to your torso til you get used to it.knocking can give you a real nasty bruise or cause it to bleed and hurt quite a bit.

Good luck! Its a game changer
 

helli

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
The nhs letter I was sent was that a finger prick was no longer needed due to the sensor being reliable.
looks like that’s another thing where different CCGs/DSNs give differing advice.
I was advised that some checking against finger pricks was necessary, especially in the scenarios i mentioned above.
When I have ignored this advice and trusted Libre for high readings I have over corrected and gone hypo. This was enough to teach myself a lesson which I felt was very important to pass on to a Libre newbie.
 

Spozkins

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
looks like that’s another thing where different CCGs/DSNs give differing advice.
I was advised that some checking against finger pricks was necessary, especially in the scenarios i mentioned above.
When I have ignored this advice and trusted Libre for high readings I have over corrected and gone hypo. This was enough to teach myself a lesson which I felt was very important to pass on to a Libre newbie.
With the libre 2 ? I was told with the first to always test.
 

helli

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
With the libre 2 ? I was told with the first to always test.
I have only just switched to the Libre 2. The advice was unchanged.
With my first 2 Libre 2 (I only have a small sample to compare with), I have found that it is still less accurate when high and it takes longer to settle. But it is more accurate within the range of 4 and 8 mmol/l.

I always finger prick first thing in the morning, last thing at night and when high or low.
Even if Libre 2 is more accurate, if I did not comparisons with finger pricks, I would not notice a dodgy sensor (yes, they exist) or a sensor that drifts over time (yes, they exist too). Maybe, my testing could be reduced once I get confidence from the readings I see.
 

Bloden

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
The nhs letter I was sent was that a finger prick was no longer needed due to the sensor being reliable.
Oooh no, I disagree with that letter! When I’m hypo I can’t rely on the Libre...it lags behind my glucose meter too much. My sensor says I’m still hypo when I’m back up in range again - if I listened to the Libre, I’d spectacularly overeat to fix the hypo and end up rebounding into the stratosphere LOL. o_O
 

Alannah

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
The nhs letter I was sent was that a finger prick was no longer needed due to the sensor being reliable.
Um. I’m not sure who wrote that letter but you might want to contact them about it. Abbots own information is that libre is ”Designed to replace the need for routine finger pricks” and that ”Finger pricks are required if your glucose readings and alarms do not match symptoms or expectations”. If you are on any form of hypo causing medication, best check anything lows or anything that doesn’t feel right with a fingerprick test.
 

Robin

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
The nhs letter I was sent was that a finger prick was no longer needed due to the sensor being reliable
We mustn’t forget, too, that the DVLA regulations state that although they accept Libre readings, you must carry your finger prick test kit with you in the car at all times, in case you need to double check a Libre reading.
 

Spozkins

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
I do still blood test with the 1 but havent started the 2 yet, am going to have another look at that letter and the info incase I fabricated that out of my own mind.

Thanks @Robin for that. Relevent because I do want to learn to drive once I figure how to renew my provisional.
 

Robin

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
I do still blood test with the 1 but havent started the 2 yet, am going to have another look at that letter and the info incase I fabricated that out of my own mind.

Thanks @Robin for that. Relevent because I do want to learn to drive once I figure how to renew my provisional.
I had a look at the Libre website, because I was sure I remembered that Abbott were advertising 'There is no need to prick your finger'. Which they do say, but there is a little footnote that reads
'Finger pricks required if your glucose reading and alarms do not match symptoms or expectations'
So basically, they are saying, if it looks wrong, it could be wrong, so check it. (Begs the question of what happens when it is wrong but it doesn’t look wrong!)
 
Top