Food swap

Rosieascott

Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Hi I’m new just diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Can any one tell me what portion size I can have of popcorn. Swapping chocolate treat for plain popcorn flavoured with cinnamon
 

trophywench

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
No nobody can tell you what portion size of any carbohydrate you can eat since everyone one of us is different. The only way you can tell is to test your BG before and after to assess what happens to your blood glucose, and adjust future portions of it accordingly.
 

ColinUK

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
What’s the chocolate treat you’re used to having?
 

Rosieascott

Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
No nobody can tell you what portion size of any carbohydrate you can eat since everyone one of us is different. The only way you can tell is to test your BG before and after to assess what happens to your blood glucose, and adjust future portions of it accordingly.
Thanks trial an error I suppose
 

Kaylz

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Do you like dark chocolate? If so then you could always have some of that, far lower carb than milk chocolate, for instance a 21g serving Tesco Salted Popcorn has 10.1g carbs but a 25g bar Aldi Moser Roth 85% dark chocolate has less than 5g carbs per bar, chocolate doesn't have to be off the menu completely xx
 

Docb

Moderator
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Hi @Rosieascott. As @trophywench says, there isn't a straight answer to your question.

Getting your brain around carbs can be a bit tricky. Can I suggest you do not think about individual items but total carb intake? Think about the total carbs you are going to head for in a day and then sort out your portion sizes to meet that target. That way, you can eat most things and if you fancy something a bit carby, then cut back on something else to keep to your target.

Kaylz suggestion is a great one. Substitute quality for quantity. If you like chocolate, then go for a better quality which is not packed out with carby filler and savour it!
 

ColinUK

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
And if you can train your palate then Montezuma Absolute Black - which is 100% cocoa - has 8g of carb per 100g. And it’s impossible to have more than a tiny piece at a time as it’s so intense.
 

everydayupsanddowns

Administrator
Staff member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Welcome to the forum @Rosieascott!

Sorry that there isn’t a simple answer to your question, it can be a frustratingly fickle and individual condition to manage, and while there are general ‘rules of thumb’ that apply to most people, everyone has to find their own tolerances and specifics for themselves.

One of the biggest questions when newly diagnosed is often ‘what can I eat’ and while there are obvious sweet and sugary things that you are cutting out already, you might be surprised how much *all* carbohydrate affects your BG levels, including rice, pasta, potatoes, bread, pastry, grains, cereals and many fruits.

The tricky thing is that blood glucose responses to various foods are highly individual, depending on your genetic makeup, gut biome, and metabolism.

The good news is that you can use a BG meter, taking a reading before and again 2hrs after eating, to see what the differences are, to identify any carbs that seem to be spiking BG.

In a sense to begin with the actual numbers themselves matter less than the differences between them, that shows the ‘meal rise’. Once you can see how much different meals and snacks raise your BG, you can begin experimenting with reducing portion sizes, and trying different types of carbohydrate (sometimes just having things at a different time of day makes a difference).

Eventually you will discover a unique menu that suits your pocket, your tastebuds, your waistline and your BG levels :)

If you haven’t been offered a BG meter (many GP surgeries are reluctant to prescribe them unless you are at risk of hypos) then it makes a bog difference to the self-fund cost to pick the right one. Strips form the largest ongoing cost and can vary from £8 to over £30 per pot. The most affordable meters members here have found are the SD Gluco Navii or the Spirit Tee2 which both have test strips at around £8 for 50
 

ianf0ster

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Thanks trial an error I suppose
Hi Rosieascott, Yes it is trial and error - but if you use a Blood Glucose meter as has been mentioned above you get feedback as soon as you digest whatever you are testing. Test before eating and then 2hrs after first bite. Aim for a spike of less than 2mmol and (for a Type 2 diabetic) to keep the maximum reading down below 8.0 mmol if you can.
 

Rosieascott

Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Hi Rosieascott, Yes it is trial and error - but if you use a Blood Glucose meter as has been mentioned above you get feedback as soon as you digest whatever you are testing. Test before eating and then 2hrs after first bite. Aim for a spike of less than 2mmol and (for a Type 2 diabetic) to keep the maximum reading down below 8.0 mmol if you can.
I have a meter I’m between 10 and 18 at the moment. only 8 in the morning. Still new to this and only been on metformin for 2 weeks . Hopefully I will learn quickly and get it under control
 

Drummer

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
As newly diagnosed I would advise cutting out sugary and starchy foods, most grain is too starchy.
Chocolate which is chocolate and not cocoa flavoured sugar with some sort of fat added is fine. I get bars from Lidl a few times a year, though they seem to have the high percent cocoa bars all year round now, not just at Christmas.
If you use a blood glucose meter to see how your levels drop as you cut out the carbs it is encouraging.
 

Rosieascott

Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Welcome to the forum @Rosieascott!

Sorry that there isn’t a simple answer to your question, it can be a frustratingly fickle and individual condition to manage, and while there are general ‘rules of thumb’ that apply to most people, everyone has to find their own tolerances and specifics for themselves.

One of the biggest questions when newly diagnosed is often ‘what can I eat’ and while there are obvious sweet and sugary things that you are cutting out already, you might be surprised how much *all* carbohydrate affects your BG levels, including rice, pasta, potatoes, bread, pastry, grains, cereals and many fruits.

The tricky thing is that blood glucose responses to various foods are highly individual, depending on your genetic makeup, gut biome, and metabolism.

The good news is that you can use a BG meter, taking a reading before and again 2hrs after eating, to see what the differences are, to identify any carbs that seem to be spiking BG.

In a sense to begin with the actual numbers themselves matter less than the differences between them, that shows the ‘meal rise’. Once you can see how much different meals and snacks raise your BG, you can begin experimenting with reducing portion sizes, and trying different types of carbohydrate (sometimes just having things at a different time of day makes a difference).

Eventually you will discover a unique menu that suits your pocket, your tastebuds, your waistline and your BG levels :)

If you haven’t been offered a BG meter (many GP surgeries are reluctant to prescribe them unless you are at risk of hypos) then it makes a bog difference to the self-fund cost to pick the right one. Strips form the largest ongoing cost and can vary from £8 to over £30 per pot. The most affordable meters members here have found are the SD Gluco Navii or the Spirit Tee2 which both have test strips at around £8 for 50
Dr didn’t offer me a meter so I bought one myself. I’ve cut out nearly all my sugar. Just learning portion sizes at the moment. Thanks for the good advise.
 

NotWorriedAtAll

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
I never used to eat chocolate before my diagnosis and now I eat it often.

My favourite chocolate treat is 1/2 teaspoonful of 100% cocoa powder mixed with two tablespoons of double cream and some erythritol sweetener. It is like the naughtiest chocolate pudding ever and it is perfectly fine because it has hardly any carbs in it at all. I also make chocolate icecream using a similar mixture but put into my ice cream maker.

Keto Chocolate cup cakes are also delicious using almond flour, eggs, baking powder and cocoa powder and sweetener to taste and then microwaved. Five minutes from getting out the ingredients to eating and you can top it with some of the chocolate cream pudding I mentioned earlier - just make less of it and use it as a topping!!
 

Rosieascott

Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Any advice from all is welcome. I’ve learnt the traffic lights on food to avoid. No reds and very little yellow. Green is good. I’m eating from a smaller plate and upping my salad and fresh greens. A small amount of nuts for a snack if hungry in the morning at work.
 

Kaylz

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1

Rosieascott

Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
I never used to eat chocolate before my diagnosis and now I eat it often.

My favourite chocolate treat is 1/2 teaspoonful of 100% cocoa powder mixed with two tablespoons of double cream and some erythritol sweetener. It is like the naughtiest chocolate pudding ever and it is perfectly fine because it has hardly any carbs in it at all. I also make chocolate icecream using a similar mixture but put into my ice cream maker.

Keto Chocolate cup cakes are also delicious using almond flour, eggs, baking powder and cocoa powder and sweetener to taste and then microwaved. Five minutes from getting out the ingredients to eating and you can top it with some of the chocolate cream pudding I mentioned earlier - just make less of it and use it as a topping!!
I like your recipe for chocolate pudding . I might try that as I love rich dark chocolate I usually buy the one with 90-95% cocoa, bitter but I only eat 2 squares at s time . I’ve nern on a keto diet before so I know about almond flour and coconut flour. I use them to make a spiced carrot and apple cake.
 

everydayupsanddowns

Administrator
Staff member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Any advice from all is welcome. I’ve learnt the traffic lights on food to avoid. No reds and very little yellow. Green is good. I’m eating from a smaller plate and upping my salad and fresh greens. A small amount of nuts for a snack if hungry in the morning at work.
For people with diabetes, the traffic light system isn’t ideal I’m afraid. It provides some useful pointers, but because it is focussed only on sugars, not on total carbohydrate, it will still recommend things that are likely to significantly raise your blood glucose levels. (your body breaks down the longer chains of starch into sugars quite rapidly)

You are better off looking at the total carbohydrate content that the sugar content, and using your BG meter to work out which carbs, and what portion sizes your body can cope well with. :)
 

NotWorriedAtAll

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
@Kaylz I used to get it in M&S and I buy it online now. I thought I got it on Amazon but I can't find it in my orders so maybe it was Holland and Barret. I bought a HUGE bag of it recently and I'm working my way through it - it was much cheaper buying a big bag. On Amazon it can be called Cacao powder - it is the same thing the important thing is to look for where it says 100% and then check the carb content and fibre content.
 

Rosieascott

Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
@Kaylz I used to get it in M&S and I buy it online now. I thought I got it on Amazon but I can't find it in my orders so maybe it was Holland and Barret. I bought a HUGE bag of it recently and I'm working my way through it - it was much cheaper buying a big bag. On Amazon it can be called Cacao powder - it is the same thing the important thing is to look for where it says 100% and then check the carb content and fibre content.
I got mine from whole foods on line
 

Drummer

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Any advice from all is welcome. I’ve learnt the traffic lights on food to avoid. No reds and very little yellow. Green is good. I’m eating from a smaller plate and upping my salad and fresh greens. A small amount of nuts for a snack if hungry in the morning at work.
The traffic light system is of little use, you need to look on the panel which gives the full breakdown. I don't eat much that comes out of boxes these days, but a limit of 10 percent carbs is good for me.
 
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