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Cute small animal picture of the day

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A Eurasian Jay (Garrulus glandarius) forages for food in a cotoneaster shrub laden with red berries in Aberystwyth…

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A conservation charity has launched an £8 million public appeal to buy an estate which could become a red squirrel superhighway. Woodland Trust Scotland hopes to raise the funds to purchase the 4,500-acre Couldoran Estate in Wester Ross, which neighbours its existing site at Ben Shieldaig. The two estates would be managed jointly and the charity wants to create a mosaic of habitats for creatures including pine martens, badgers, red squirrels, mountain hares, golden eagles and peregrines, while it is hoped wildcats may one day return…

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An Andean wolf near where the Dominga mining project will be built in La Higuera, Chile…

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A peacock opens its plumage at Willowbank Wildlife Reserve in Christchurch, New Zealand…

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People feed Tonkean Macaques (Macaca tonkeana) in the Coffee Garden Mountain Area, Parigi Moutong Regency, Indonesia. The government has banned the feeding of the macaques as they are becoming increasingly dependent on humans and are often on roads, endangering their safety…

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Sweet chestnuts lie on a woodland floor near Ashford in Kent after strong winds have brought them down from their trees. The deciduous sweet chestnut was introduced to the UK by the Romans and was widely planted for its timber and its nuts, often ground into flour. It now behaves like a native tree, particularly in south-east England where it spreads through many woodlands by seed…

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