Changing medication

Tonybeedsy1

Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Hello there. Fairly new to this. I recently changed my medication from sukkarto to alogliptin. The side effects were just too much. The first 3 days my blood readings have jumped up by a couple at all times in the day. Is this normal and will it drop back down when I get settled down. First time I've gone over 10 for 6 weeks.
 

grovesy

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
I have never taken just one or the other, but Metformin(Sukkarto),does not usally have big effects on most peoples levels. Are you feeling unwell or stressed asthis can also effect levels.
 

Tonybeedsy1

Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
I had a really bad day on Saturday. Just curled up in a ball with stomach ache. I rang the docs on Monday morning and she changed me off sukkarto onto this alogliptin. My stomach is so much better at the expense of levels going up slightly. It's not a drastic jump but I hope it will go back down to where I was. I'm probably reading into it a bit to seriously to be honest.
 

Becka

Well-Known Member
Most medications stop working more quickly that they start, so because you are changing between different types you should expect to give it some time.

Although mine was a different situation, when I was put on Sitagliptin and it was only in the third week I saw some benefit from it. I also stopped Metformin for a week and that was enough to see a big increase in my levels.

Here are some more detailed explanations.

Biguanides — which includes Metformin, of which Sukkarto is a modified release brand — work by simply increasing insulin sensitivity. Effectively making the insulin you release work better. As type 2 diabetes is characterized by insulin resistance it is an obvious first choice medication, especially as it has a low risk of serious side effects, a long proven history of successfully helping manage diabetes.

DPP-4 inhibitors (Gliptins) — which include Alogliptin (brand name Vipidia in the U.K., or Vipidomet if combined with Metformin) — prolong the life of incretins in your system. These are hormones released after eating that cause you to produce insulin, stop releasing glycogen (stored glucose), and slow down the absorption of nutrients to make you feel full and stop eating. An enzyme in the body called DPP-4 (dipeptidyl peptidase 4) performs various tasks, one of which is to manage the metabolism by degrading incretins. So inhibiting this enzyme has the effect of increasing your incretin levels and prolonging their effects.

As you can see, the way Sukkarto and Alogliptin work is completely different, they are not like-for-like swaps. So at the moment one is quickly leaving your system, whilst you are more slowly building up the other.
 

DaveB

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1.5 LADA
Hi. Metformin will reduce your BS by just a small amount. The Gliptin family just reduce BS spikes so may not reduce your average BS by the same amount as Metformin. Was your Sukkarto (Metformin) the plain version or the SR version? If not the latter then ask the GP for Metformin SR. Have you reduced the carbs in your diet to avoid needing any meds?
 

Tonybeedsy1

Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
I was originally on normal metformin and changed to slow release. Ridiculous side effects and stuck it for 6 weeks
 

Becka

Well-Known Member
Sukkarto is a prolonged release form of Metformin from Morningside Healthcare, which is why it is prescribed by brand rather than as a generic.
 
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