Carbs in just 25grams of Uncooked porridge Oats

paul.johnson

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Hi Can anyone tell me the amount of Carbs in just 25g of uncooked porridge oats, I can only find cooked portions,
I dont cook it, have sort of Muesli

25g of Porridge Oats
4 Raspberries
10 Blueberries
Alpro Yoghurt Plain 3 tbs
splash of Sweetner
35 grams of carbs approx unless totally wrong lol
 

Robin

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Hi Can anyone tell me the amount of Carbs in just 25g of uncooked porridge oats, I can only find cooked portions,
I dont cook it, have sort of Muesli

25g of Porridge Oats
4 Raspberries
10 Blueberries
Alpro Yoghurt Plain 3 tbs
splash of Sweetner
35 grams of carbs approx unless totally wrong lol
The best website I've found to look these things up is Tesco's, their nutritional info under each product they sell seems more comprehensive than most. Their own brand porridge oats, and Scott’s, both have 60g of carb per 100g raw weight, so 15g for a 25g portion.
 

Toucan

Forum Host
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Hello @paul.johnson
Carbs & Cals book lists uncooked porridge oats as 71g carbs per 100g.
 

Kaylz

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Don't you have the packet for your oats?

I certainly wouldn't rely on the information posted above from carbs and cals because Quaker jumbo has 60g carbs per 100g dry but Morrisons own cheap oats only have 56.1g carbs per 100g dry so for me at least that difference would make a change in the insulin I required and using the above on the oats from Morrison's I'd end up hypo xx
 

paul.johnson

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Don't you have the packet for your oats?

I certainly wouldn't rely on the information posted above from carbs and cals because Quaker jumbo has 60g carbs per 100g dry but Morrisons own cheap oats only have 56.1g carbs per 100g dry so for me at least that difference would make a change in the insulin I required and using the above on the oats from Morrison's I'd end up hypo xx
I must pay more attention when ripping boxes and packets open and putting into containers lol
 

Kaylz

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
I must pay more attention when ripping boxes and packets open and putting into containers lol
Mines is in a container too but I always check the carb information on everything lol xx
 

Docb

Moderator
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
I see you are a T1 and understand that actual carb content is important to you and the couple of observations I will make are intended to indicate why your question is so difficult to provide a definitive answer to.

As regulars on here have probably picked up I am a bit of a number nerd and when it comes to carb content of stuff I have found it is a minefield. I'm with @Kaylz, looking things up in apps and the like when you are talking about generic things like oats or spuds has to have a big "ish" put on the end of the number you are given.

One of the reasons for the lack of precision is that carb content of anything is actually quite difficult to measure. Take the humble spud in all its varieties and styles of preparation. Because it is hard to measure the carb content, nobody as far as I can see has got round to measuring the carb content of all the different varieties, growing conditions and time after planting let alone the effect of all the different methods of preparing them. Look up carb content of spuds in a number of sources and you will get quite different answers. Same must apply to oats, rice, and cereals and anything else with a significant carb content. You know that these things are up in the high range, but figuring quite what allowance you need to make for any particular set of circumstances is not easy. I'm guessing it has to come down to individual experience and getting an understanding of what works for you.

Labels on prepared foods are a bit more reliable, at least somebody somewhere has thought about what has gone into the product and although many values quoted are guestimates it's likely that they have been made by people with the knowledge needed to get it reasonably right.

Don't know if that helps but I like the idea of making your own museli. At least when you get a recipe that suits you and you can allow for consistently, you can reproduce it with confidence. I make my own granola for breakfast and stick with the same source of oats, fruit and nuts because I know it works.
 

weecee

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
When transferring cereals or porridge oats to a container, I cut out the nutritional info square on the box and put it in the container so I don't forget the details.
 

Hepato-pancreato

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 3c
Sounds like your making what they call overnight oats. You put your ingriedients in a container with a lid and leave overnight in the fridge. Then you eat it for breakfast. So important what others have said, cut nutritional info off the box or bag and sellotape to your container for future reference. I have a nutri bullet and always add oats to smoothies but weigh everything on my digital scales, then use my calculator to work out how much insulin i need for my smoothie.
 
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