Can't cope with low carb diet

Anitram

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
I have a limited diet due to a wheat and lactose intolerance and a hatred of Vegetables, Rice and spicy food. Always go to bed hungry. Help please if anyone can
Are you able to eat things like meat, fish, eggs, nuts...???
 

helli

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Wheat and rice are high carb so an intolerance and hatred of them should not affect a low carb diet.
Many vegetables (carrots, peas, etc.) are higher carb too so a low carb diet is a good reason to avoid them.
Spices are just flavouring so, again, avoid them is not a problem with low carb. Although when most peple say "spicy" they really mean "hot spices like chilli" rather than warming spices such as nutmeg and cinnamon as well as herbs such as basil and tarragon which I use to add interest to my foods.

So your intolerances and hatreds shouldn't stop you eat typical low carb food such as the ones @Anitram lists - meat, fish, eggs, nuts.

Maybe if yo describe what you do like to eat, you may get some assistance.
 
I do eat meat fish and eggs but not nuts. I eat gluten free porridge and make my own Spelt bread which I can tolerate. I just want to know what carbs are ok as I am hungry a lot of the time. Thanks
 

Christy

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
There is a Carb & Calorie Counter book (or App if you prefer) which details all carbs and gives you pictures of portion sizes. That might be helpful to you. Or weigh your portions & google the carbs/100g and make up a list of your foodstuffs.
 

rebrascora

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
If you are hungry then eat more fat.... plenty of butter on your spelt bread and cheese and cream in your morning coffee. Fat takes longer to digest and therefore keeps you feeling full for longer. It also helps to stabilse BG levels and provides slow release energy.
 

Anitram

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
I do eat meat fish and eggs but not nuts. I eat gluten free porridge and make my own Spelt bread which I can tolerate. I just want to know what carbs are ok as I am hungry a lot of the time. Thanks
Unfortunately it's not carbs you need if you feel hungry. What many of us do after cutting down on carbs is to replace them with fats and protein, the only alternative sources of nutrition. Nuts are a good source of both. I buy gluten free nut bars, currently KIND Dark Chocolate & Sea Salt (there are others, eg ALDI's own brand) and packs of Graze Chilli & Lime. There are carbs in both but less than 10g in each, unlike some cereal bars which can have 3 times as many. Full fat natural Greek yogurt with crushed walnuts and some berries is a filling dessert and if I have that after our evening meal I find I'm not hungry at bedtime and am testing in the morning off the back of a 10-hour fast.
A low carb diet usually involves eating more vegetables and salads so it's a shame that they don't feature in your diet.
 

Inka

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Im a vegetable lover not a hater :) Quite apart from the health benefits, they‘re good at bulking up meals.

Are there any you like? Have you tried steaming them, roasting them or eating them raw?

Low carb is under 130g a day. How many are you aiming for?
 

grovesy

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
If they are lactose intolerant would butter, cream, and milk be a problem?
 

NotWorriedAtAll

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
If they are lactose intolerant would butter, cream, and milk be a problem?
I am lactose intolerant. Luckily the higher the fat content dairy and cheese etc the lower the lactose content and much has virtually no lactose especially hard cheeses and blue cheeses. Good quality butter has virtually no lactose. Lactose is a milk sugar so it is a good thing for a diabetic to avoid it.
 

NotWorriedAtAll

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
I have a limited diet due to a wheat and lactose intolerance and a hatred of Vegetables, Rice and spicy food. Always go to bed hungry. Help please if anyone can
I would say you should eat nice juicy fatty cuts of meat and chicken and learn to make gluten free low carb bread and make keto fries that taste a lot like potato fries but without the carbs and with no gluten.

Heavenly Fan on Youtube has many gluten free recipes full of lovely filling and highly nutritious foods and you will be bound to find something there you like and can make.

 

Ljc

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1.5 LADA
If it is if any help. You can buy Lactofree milk, cream and cheese. I buy it as I too am lactose intolerant and do not wish to give up dairy. Sadly it is dearer than the ordinary ones .
 

NotWorriedAtAll

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
I am aware that Lactose is a milk sugar thank you !
Sorry I didn't mean to cause any offence. I am used to being a teacher and when I reply to one person I am expecting there will be other people listening/reading the reply who may not have the same level of knowledge as the specific person who sparked the reply. These threads (as you know) are read by many people both at the time when they happen and later when new people come onto the forums to seek information. I know I read a lot without commenting in my early days after diagnosis and I had huge holes in my knowledge back then.
 

Maca44

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
I didn't know that so had my hand up calling out Miss.Miss but teacher didn't hear me :)
 

everydayupsanddowns

Administrator
Staff member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Do you check your own BG with a meter @snowball12 ?

Just wondering if you had been able to see which carbs (types and amounts) suit your unique metabolism / gut biome by checking before meals and again 2hrs after?

That way you can start with what you eat now, experiment with adding extras or upping portions, and test new things as you introduce them?
 
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AndBreathe

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
@snowball - Having a couple of food intolerances shouldn't be a barrier to successfully living a low carb lifestyle, if that's what you want to do.

I'm fortunate to like most foods, but have to live gluten-free, which obviously encompasses wheat and several other foods, so I have a good understanding of that aspect of things.

I don't know how long you have been managing your wheat intolerance, and whether your intolerance is to wheat alone or to gluten. I ask that as gluten lurks in many, many more foods than wheat alone.

I've been living a reduced carb lifestyle for about 7 years now and there is zero doubt it becomes easier over time. Initially, it seems like every moment of every day is taken up working out what to eat next, or researching whether x, y or z is compatible with how we "have to be".

Whilst veggies are a convenient way of filling up on a LC lifestyle, it's astonishing where nutrients can come from for those who either don't like, or find they have to banish veggies from their lives. If you eat meat, and can eat a decent range of meats, there are likely to be few gaps in your nutritional needs. So, to summarise, I wouldn't invest any anxiety in your dislike of veg. Eat what you can tolerate, and leave the Brussels, kale, swede atc., to me and the others who hoover them up.

If you are feeling hungry, then rather than look for carbs you can eat, my suggestion would be to look towards adding protein and fats.

As has been mentioned above, a lactose intolerance doesn't necessarily equate to a ban on all dairy produce. Most hard cheeses, butter, ghee, cream, clotted cream and so on are low in lactose. Depending on the severity of your intolerance, you may be surprised how much of those you can safely snaffle.

My understanding about lactose intolerance is that, unlike gluten-free, where there must be a total exclusion to achieve benefits, reducing lactose, to the individual's own threshold can bring excellent results, so that could be something to consider.

I know when "getting into" and reduced carb lifestyle, it can be very easy to look for the carbs we can eat, rather than what we can eat that doesn't necessarily contain carbs, but time has taught me, personally, that when it comes to things like curry, the flavour and goodness is in the curry. The rice (which I appreciate you don't like anyway) is just a carrier. Similarly with pasta (although unless you go for the FreeFrom ranges, which I don't), you will have ditched those anyway. So, in my world, things like curry, (pasta) bolognaise etc, are served in a bowl, and where necessary, finished up with a spoon. All it means is, I get more of the delicious stuff and less of the padding out.

What sort of things do you like to eat? With a few clues in that direction, we might be able to make some specific suggestions.
 

Spoon

Active Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
I'm going to be controversial here and say, don't do the low carb diet then! If it's stressing you out and you're always hungry, you are going to snap and binge at some point, which is also not good for your diabetes. I am not a fan of low carb either and I'm quite fussy with a 'tickle stomach' too, no gallbladder either, so can't do high fat without some very unpleasant (and painful) results. Look at Diabetes UK's Mediterranean Diet approach on their website - this is also proven to help https://www.diabetes.org.uk/guide-t...eating-with-diabetes/meal-plans/mediterranean

Low Carb/Keto is very trendy at the moment and appears to have overtaken veganuary in popularity this year, but it doesn't mean it's something you 'must' do.
 

Swilko

Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Although I think LCHF diet is the best way forward I do understand your predicament in seeking an alternative. I must admit that I have been lucky with my control by using an unorthodox method of ingesting a pill containing a very small amount of cannabis oil and it works and this has been my mode of treatment for the last few years. I have not posted my method on the forum because of the fear of causing controversy etc. Actually, it is not my method but through research, I have adopted other people’s ideas. This therefore allows me to eat at will and still maintain a normal HbA1c with the last reading being 39 or 5.7%. I will also be controversial and suggest that Spoon is absolutely right about not getting stressed, as I believe that has a greater impact on high blood sugars than most imagine. I have not posted my method because the stigma surrounding cannabis in the U.K. is still so prevalent but intend to either post in a USA or Canadian forum where it is legal over there.
 

Maca44

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Although I think LCHF diet is the best way forward I do understand your predicament in seeking an alternative. I must admit that I have been lucky with my control by using an unorthodox method of ingesting a pill containing a very small amount of cannabis oil and it works and this has been my mode of treatment for the last few years. I have not posted my method on the forum because of the fear of causing controversy etc. Actually, it is not my method but through research, I have adopted other people’s ideas. This therefore allows me to eat at will and still maintain a normal HbA1c with the last reading being 39 or 5.7%. I will also be controversial and suggest that Spoon is absolutely right about not getting stressed, as I believe that has a greater impact on high blood sugars than most imagine. I have not posted my method because the stigma surrounding cannabis in the U.K. is still so prevalent but intend to either post in a USA or Canadian forum where it is legal over there.
I think any suggestions help and if a small amount of cannabis oil works for you it's worth sharing. There are plenty of plant based things that help people and cannabis is just that it's not as thought your promoting drug use as the amounts are so small.
 
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