Another newbie

Midnightcatpatrol

Active Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Hi.

Newly diagnosed T1 at the ripe old age of 35.

I was otherwise fit and well but caught COVID in march. After that I lost 15kg iof weight in 3 months. Started to pee all the time and following each pee with another glass of water.. I couldn't get through a night unbroken in the weeks leading up to diagnosis. The hunger, oh my. Iid eat dinner and 20 minutes later have to eat again. But I still kept losing weight.

Finally went to the gp who sent me for some bloods. Phlebotomist mentioned my blood looked strange.

2 am that night my wife and I are awoken my banging on the door. I look out of the window and see an ambulance. I could not fathom it was for me. I honestly thought , "oh, they must have broken down and need to use the phone", like it's still the 1950s.

Anyway they were sent by the hospital as my lab results were flagged although they didn't have the results. The paperwork said ™dka™. So, I get in the ambulance. Honestly when I got in the back, all the anxiety about actually finding out what was wrong with me melted away. It was out of my hands now. The paramedic pricked my finger - unrecordable.

Arrived at the hospital and popped into majors, lines go in, more blood comes out. Someone manages to find my blood results from that afternoon. Blood glucose 37, ketones 1.5, sodium 125, hba1c 170. So not quite dka thankfully although o was starting to smell sweet in the day leading up to all this. My wife thought I was sneaking chocolate and hiding it so I didn't have to share! This made me laugh.

So, some big bags of fluid and a short insulin infusion over night got my BM down to below 15. My first basal dose of lantus was given and I was allowed home for breakfast. "Oh god what do I eat?' I thought. I also noticed I didn't feel tired. My cells for the first time in weeks were able to use glucose, I felt buzzed.

Later that day I meet my diabetes nurse for the first time. Lots of chat, lots of explanation. I'm so impressed with how quickly it was all sorted. I am given my big bag of kit and I toddle home again. My third journey to and from the hospital in 24 hours. My nurse will call in a couple of days to check in on me.

The next 48 hours begin to show me how this disease plays with your mind. I feel elated as my bms start to fall. I get excited. Do I need insukin? Is this actually type 2? But then I don't want it to be type 2 because then I'll feel guilt. But I don't want it to be type 1 because this insulin business is going to interfere with life big time.

Gradually the enormity of the situation dawn's like the sun rises. Add in a couple of hypos after walking in the hot weather, a ghastly punishment for trying to reduce my cardiovascular risk factors, and its unsurprising I had a few wobbles.

But,. Best to be open because otherwise others won't understand it, not even closest friends. My diabetes team are so accessible too. We aren't alone.
 

Toucan

Forum Host
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Hello @Midnightcatpatrol and thank you for joining the forum and telling us about your traumatic experiences.
It sounds as if the NHS have done an amazing job in helping you through this.

There will be much to get used to on the way ahead, but the forum id a great place to get help and support and there are many years of experience and expertise amongst it's members. So hope you will keep posting and let us know how things progress, and ask away with any questions.

One point though .... if the diagnosis ends up as T1 or T2, the causes are complex and many issues still unknown, and it is NOT your fault that this has happened.
 

SB2015

Forum Host
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Welcome to the forum @Midnightcatpatrol . Sorry to hear about your diagnosis but pleased that they were on the ball at your hospital. T1 is so often missed by GPs in adults. You are a mere youngster for your diagnosis as there are a fair few of us on here diagnosed in our 40s and 50s.

There is a lot to take in at the start but it is good to hear that your specialist team are accessible. It is a manageable condition, it just takes a bit of thought and planning in this new normal life. Fire away with any questions that arise. I have learnt most of the practical day to day stuff from others on here.
 

stephknits

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Welcome to the forum - what a dramatic story! I can remember exactly how it felt when first getting insulin, like a dog had lifted and I was walking on springs instead of through treacle.
I does take some adjusting to and life requires a bit more planning, but j think you have made a great start and exercise is so good to do. There are plenty of type 1s in here who do lot sir exercise (sadly I'm not one of them!).
I like your idea of being open as well, very important as it can be a lonely road.
 

trophywench

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Welcome to our merry band - the club that no-one actually wanted to join. You do meet some very nice people here though, so it's not all bad! :)

You'll probably think I'm potty suggesting this - but you could do far worse than to read a book entitled 'Type 1 diabetes in children, adults and young adults' by Ragnar Hanas - it's written (as the title leads you to expect) for normal people to understand rather than keep using medical terms you have to look up to discover what on earth it's on about - so actually useful and informative even if the new T1 happens to be 50-odd instead of 5 or 15.

Your GP was on the ball, thank heavens for that to begin with, plus the hospital were too by fast tracking your A&E visit, so thank heavens for that. It is a Big Change alright - but gradually we'll all help you make it NOT be a major change in your life cos it's so much easier to live with if you try and get it to fit in with you, BUT you have to agree to playing by it's rules - not yours for it to be a comfortable friendship.

It is a marathon - not a sprint!
 

Midnightcatpatrol

Active Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Thank you everyone for all your kind words. Really means a lot!

The most frustrating thing so far is the insulin has blurred my near vision. Not the best time to not be able to read the back of food products!
 

trophywench

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Hey ho - nothing's changed then - except there hadn't used to be any info on the back of packets when I was diagnosed and couldn't focus once I went on insulin so it was a lot more hit and miss. Oh and they hadn't invented to internet either back then - now you can just increase your screen resolution size and also invest in a pair of supermarket 'Ready readers' to get by for the time being until the eyesight settles down - any decent optician/opthalmologist will tell you to give it approx 3 months. Took mine about 5-6 weeks - I worked as a clerk when everything was handwritten before being sent to the typing pool! So by that time I was as stir crazy as I am now having been locked down since March ....... at least there's daytime TV these days!
 

everydayupsanddowns

Administrator
Staff member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
Welcome to the forum @Midnightcatpatrol

Thanks for sharing your diagnosis story :)

Hope you get some clarity on your diagnosis soon. Interestingly, in a straw poll I took a few years ago 35 was the age at which people were most likely to be diagnosed T2 and then later reclassified as T1, so it wouldn’t surprise me if you were either classic T1, or LADA (a slower onset T1 that develops in adulthood)

I wouldn’t worry too much about injections getting in the way of life, modern insulin treatment options and tech like insulin pens and pumps allow for very flexible, precise and individually tailored regimen, so you don’t have to be restricted much around food choices, timing and things like exercise and activity. it’s just a matter of working out how to manage things :)
 
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