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Advice and wisdom needed please.

Discussion in 'General Messageboard' started by Greymouser, Sep 12, 2019.

  1. Greymouser

    Greymouser Well-Known Member

    Relationship to Diabetes:
    Type 2
    Sorry posting this here, especially since it has been so long since posting on here, but I need advice and a little sorting out.:rolleyes:

    A little background: It has been two years since I was diagnosed as type two, but quickly got it under control and by Feb 2018 I had levels down to the mid thirties, so all good, I was a good boy, or so I thought.

    I was told I had background retinopathy in September 2017, in Sept 2018 told I had Maculopathy and went to a three month screening schedule. No problem, unpleasant, but better to be safe than sorry I guess, even though my diabetes is well under control.

    Today I was summoned to the ophthalmology dept. and was screened by the surgeon and another doctor and they decided I needed laser eye surgery. OK, but why did I need it, why did my diabetic maculopathy get worse, even though everyone told me my diabetes was well under control? I did ask the consultant, but his answers were vague and he did not seem interested in my doubts and questions. He only wants to laser one eye, which I guess I should be grateful for, but it is annoying when I do not have all the answers and my eyesight is completely unaffected, in fact almost perfect according to my optician. The fact that the main potential side effect of the treatment, is damage to the retina, potential blindness, does not help!

    I just cannot help considering the old saying: " If it ain't broke, don't try to fix it! "

    Non of this is helped by the apparent arrogance of the consultant, he as good as said after I told him I had read about the condition online, that he knew far better than all that silly stuff, I should ignore it. He did not seem to believe me, when I told him my diabetes was well under control and he could not access the records himself! This of course made me doubt more! :rolleyes:

    I need information. What are the likely consequences if I avoid the treatment? What is the chance of it going wrong? The consultant said very slim, but their literature and what I have read, suggest otherwise. The consultant did not even properly answer these two! I bet I can think of many more questions too, if I think about it...

    What should I do, do you think? I wish I could get to see my GP, but last time I did it took five weeks from the request to actually seeing him, the surgery is in three weeks. :(
     
  2. everydayupsanddowns

    everydayupsanddowns Moderator

    Relationship to Diabetes:
    Type 1
    We’ve a few members who have had successful laser treatment @Greymouser - hopefully they will be along soon to offer their experiences.
     
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  3. Greymouser

    Greymouser Well-Known Member

    Relationship to Diabetes:
    Type 2
    I hope so, as time is ticking and soon I will have to decide if I should have the treatment or not. I need all the information I can get from as many sources as I can manage. So far the information I am getting is mainly negative. I am leaning quite heavily towards either a second opinion, or asking to be just monitored for now, if I can because it will take weeks to see my GP.
     
  4. Kaylz

    Kaylz Well-Known Member

    Relationship to Diabetes:
    Type 1
    I was diagnosed with diabetic macular oedema a month after I was diagnosed Type 1, I have had numerous eye injections for that

    Last November I had lasering to both eyes in the one session for proliferative retinopathy, my eyesight hadn't been effected by it but I will do anything to save my site, they prefer to do treatment to stop progression before it starts causing problems, my lasering was done in about half an hour and I was out to continue my day as normal, yes I needed a little help that day to check my bloods and dial up my insulin pen as my sight was pretty blurry but was fine the next day

    If it's needed then I wouldn't suggest not having it as you don't want it to progress and possibly not be able to do anything by that time

    My hba1c's have been good but unfortunately things can still happen, my consultant and dsn's just say I've been VERY unlucky
    xx
     
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  5. Eddy Edson

    Eddy Edson Well-Known Member

    Relationship to Diabetes:
    Type 2
    I found out last week that I’m very close to needing eyeball injections for diabetic macular oedema. This despite everything being clear back in Jan and having excellent BG, BP and cholesterol since a few months after diabetes diagnosis. Unfortunately, diabetes sh*t can happen no matter how well you’re dealing with it.

    I don’t know anything about lasering except that it’s a very common procedure which has been performed for decades. My guess is that the benefits probably far outweigh any risks, fwiw
     
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  6. Guzzian

    Guzzian Well-Known Member

    Relationship to Diabetes:
    Type 1
    I went through exactly the same feelings as you. I can see fine, it must OK.
    But as Kaylz eluded to they are trying to prevent a problem in the future.
    You really should have the treatment if they suggest it.

    I have macula oedema and need injections, it's pretty unpleasant but can save your sight.
     
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  7. Flower

    Flower Well-Known Member

    Relationship to Diabetes:
    Type 1
    Hello @Greymouser

    Laser for retinopathy or maculopathy is only offered as a treatment when it reaches the threshold for that treatment. Maculopathy and retinopathy are both silent, by the time you see the damage in changes to your vision you're at an advanced stage. Screening and timely treatment if needed are vital tools in diabetic eye care.

    It is one of the complications that can happen just because we've got diabetes and in some cases as @Kaylz has said it is just very bad luck.

    I find the following site really informative - Scroll down to Early maculopathy and laser. http://www.diabeticretinopathy.org.uk/diabetic_maculopathy.html#early
     
  8. Greymouser

    Greymouser Well-Known Member

    Relationship to Diabetes:
    Type 2
    Thank you everyone, I knew it was a good idea to come here and ask, I wish I had stayed posting here. Silly me. :oops:

    It is good to hear the other side of things, because over the last few days I have heard an awful lot of negative regarding Ophthalmology treatment, with several telling me they wish they had not gone for the laser treatment, that their eyesight was ruined. Thank you Kaylz, it is good to know that it is not just me and that I am not the only one who has got good numbers regarding blood sugar levels, but still got retinal problems. Odd that I find it reassuring that it is not so uncommon to get issues, even when diabetes is well controlled. Not a club I would really want to be a member of, really. ;)

    That is a good link Flower, thank you. I will have a good read tomorrow now, because I am very tired and a little stressed.

    At least now I think I can see a way forward, but still need more information, which I will find. One other question, it has been suggested I contact the local Eye Clinic Liason Officer, by a couple of people, but I was not even aware that such existed. Does anyone know anything about them? Should they be all around?
     
    everydayupsanddowns likes this.
  9. mikeyB

    mikeyB Well-Known Member

    Relationship to Diabetes:
    Type 1
    As I have said elsewhere, diabetic eye problems, particularly in Type 2, don’t seem to directly relate to diabetes control as far as onset and progress is concerned. In your case, I would surmise that the onset predated your diagnosis. That is surprisingly common.

    As far as treatment goes, I tend to follow consultant advice, they are the ones with experience in treatment and progress. They would never advise unnecessary treatment.

    Keep up the good work:)
     
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  10. mikeydt1

    mikeydt1 Well-Known Member

    Relationship to Diabetes:
    Type 2
    the problem with anything like this when it comes to operations is that when we see consultant or surgeons and they want to operate you are basically put on the spot there and then to make a decision and not only that they then want the consent form filling in.

    it is only when we go back home that we then weigh the pros and cons and sometimes the cons outweigh.

    i have been put in this situation quite a few times one was a def as i had gall stones and was very poorly but another made me ill and just recent was asked about another op i said yes then when i got home i started thinking that part of it was way too risky and then backed out.

    after backing out i looked for the alternate safe route and have a planned surgery but doing it awake and the risks are a lot less. what was too high risk for me was knowing that part of my face could of been paralysed, the wisdom tooth was next to the facial nerves where as the other was not really high risk.

    in the end when it comes to it we should all be given time to think what we are been asked to under go and also look further in to things before making that final decision.
     
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  11. Greymouser

    Greymouser Well-Known Member

    Relationship to Diabetes:
    Type 2
    Another question from anyone, particularly mikeyB as I thought he was a retired GP. What are the risks of leaving it untreated and just monitoring it? Especially interested in the likelihood of the bad things happening. Also what are the chances of something going wrong, with treatment? I do wish the consultant had been more forthcoming about such things. Another thing, how do I get past my squeamishness regarding my eyes and him touching them?

    Anyone able to give me the odds please?
     
  12. Kaylz

    Kaylz Well-Known Member

    Relationship to Diabetes:
    Type 1
    If they are suggesting lasering now then it's needed to stop it from getting worse, leaving it untreated and monitoring will just let the problems progress further and become worse

    Things could go wrong when you walk out your front door everyday, even in the house, its very minimal that it will go wrong

    You are given anaesthetic drops and a lens is put at your eye so he isn't really going to be touching them

    to me the benefits of keeping sight is far better than the risk of losing it if not getting the treatment needed
     
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  13. Guzzian

    Guzzian Well-Known Member

    Relationship to Diabetes:
    Type 1
    As I understand it, the laser cauterises the problematic blood vessels to prevent blood leaking into the eye fluid.
    If you just monitor the situation and leave it until the leak has happened it's too late.

    What could go wrong? Well anything could go wrong, but very likely won't.
     
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  14. AJLang

    AJLang Well-Known Member

    Relationship to Diabetes:
    Type 1
    If you do not have the laser in time the macula damage will almost certainly be irreversible. I lost my macula vision in one eye for another reason ten years ago and it has been a nightmare. I so wish that my problem could have been sorted out with laser.
     
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  15. Greymouser

    Greymouser Well-Known Member

    Relationship to Diabetes:
    Type 2
    I know it is an irrational fear, but I am very squeamish when it comes to eyes, even dislike seeing some one else putting contact lenses in their eyes! Not helped by the way the younger doctor described the equipment. I get the sense that it is going to make me a little claustrophobic. Could someone who has experienced the procedure explain the process please? Put my mind to rest a little bit and help stop my imagination running wild. @Kaylz maybe, as you seem to be a veteran of what I am having to face.

    Sorry for being such a baby about this. :oops:
     
  16. mikeyB

    mikeyB Well-Known Member

    Relationship to Diabetes:
    Type 1
    It’s not really any more claustrophobic than the examination that gave them the diagnosis. They use anaesthetic drops in your eyes, so when they insert any lenses or eyelid clips you won’t feel a thing. Just enjoy the view. And ask a nurse to hold your hand while all this going on. You’d be amazed how comforting that is.
     
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  17. Kaylz

    Kaylz Well-Known Member

    Relationship to Diabetes:
    Type 1
    @Greymouser for my proliferative retinopathy there really wasn't much to the lasering, I sat in a computer style chair, put my head in a rest like when you get pictures of your eyes done etc and there was a lens put in front of it, a good few zaps and both eyes were done in half an hour and off I popped to continue my day xx
     
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  18. Eddy Edson

    Eddy Edson Well-Known Member

    Relationship to Diabetes:
    Type 2
    I completely understand yr blechhhh! reaction to the whole thing - but I don't think there's anybody who'll say don't do it & it really doesn't sound much different to a routine eye scan.
     
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  19. Greymouser

    Greymouser Well-Known Member

    Relationship to Diabetes:
    Type 2
    You see, the thought of this makes me feel like throwing up. Eyelid clips; lens on the eye. :eek:
    I struggle to watch my brother in law put his contact lenses on, never mind when one gets dislodged if he rubs his eye! I think the procedure is going to be difficult, but at least better than the alternative. I think. :)
     
  20. Flower

    Flower Well-Known Member

    Relationship to Diabetes:
    Type 1
    The main thing is your eye will be anaesthetised by the drops before they do anything. You just feel a bit of pressure as the lens is put against your eye and then after you're settled in the right position you see a rapid succession of laser flashes as the small area concerned is sealed off. It's all over very quickly, waiting for the dilation drops to work takes the longest time.

    I do understand your fear, eyelids completely freak me but being on the other side of the action makes it easier in that you physically can't watch.
     
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