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‘Life Without Diabetes’ by Professor Roy Taylor

Toucan

Forum Host
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
‘Life Without Diabetes’ by Professor Roy Taylor
I found the book easy to read and informative, and it changed my perspective of the ‘Newcastle Diet’, as well as several other pre-conceptions.
It can be used as a guide to the ‘Newcastle Diet’ – just start reading at Chapter 7, but there is also some interesting information in the rest of the book.

There is an explanation of what Type 2 diabetes is, and how glucose and fat are handled in the body, and Professor Taylor describes his theory on the genetic input to diabetes. This leads to challenging the link between obesity and diabetes, and an explanation of why a large number of obese people are not diabetic, and many outwardly thin people are diabetic.

He defines a ‘personal fat threshold’, if exceeded this means that there is too much fat stored internally particularly around the liver and pancreas, which disrupts the production of insulin.

He concludes that the solution is a significant weight loss to seriously diminish the fat around the liver and pancreas. For most newly diagnosed Type 2 sufferers he suggests as weight decrease of around 15kgs, and a permanent decrease in food consumption on average by 25%. How this is achieved is not so important as the end result of weight loss, and sustained new eating habits.

The ‘Newcastle diet’ is one way, but it is more important that the individual finds the way that is right for them e.g Low Carb ,Mediterranean, intermittent fasting etc. Either rapid weight loss or slower weight loss over a longer period is an acceptable way to achieve the goal. The various approaches are all outlined. There is no ‘one size fits all’.

The Newcastle Diet arose as part of his research, when he needed a group of Type 2’s to lose weight rapidly, so that he could analyse the effects. Hence the milk shakes etc were just a simple way of doing this. The group however were so overwhelming happy with the result that the idea spread and the ‘Newcastle Diet’ evolved.

There are clear instructions on the 3 phases of the diet in the book, plus some useful recipes. Milkshakes aren’t essential in the first phase, and it can be any nutritious daily food intake of 800cals. Phases 2 and 3 provide a gradual move to sustainable healthy eating.

I particularly enjoyed Chapter 9 ‘Don’t be fooled’, which discusses the plethora of health stories that are always around. It put forward ideas on how to sort out solid information from misleading observations or baseline opinion.

All in all a surprisingly informative, good read.
 

Wirralass

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
That's very interesting Neens, thank you for sharing. I did it the slow way with diet & exercise and reduced my HbA1c from 53 at dx in *2016 to 33: then 31 in 2019.
WL

Edited to add*
 
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Toucan

Forum Host
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Thanks @wirralass
Yes I also did it the slow way, - and am still doing! - as I hope to get below the 40 threshold eventually, as you have.
I can see though that the crash diet described in the book would appeal to some people, as long as they follow through and end up with eating habits that they can sustain - but the plan described in the book does have a final phase that leads to this.
It is the usual case that 'no one size fits all' and some people are having success with this method. I guess it is the destination that matters, more than the route taken to get there.
 

Wirralass

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Hi @Toucan. The only reason I elected to reduce my HbA1c by diet & exercise alone was coz I just couldn't tolerate 'Metfartin' or 'Metfartin' SR (Sukarto) After a few months of being housebound due to the $%@¥#$₩ awful side effects that made me feel so exhausted, I took myself off this medication then explained my decision to my GP at my next appointment. He was happy for me to continue to manage my Diabetes without medication.

My more recent HbA1c was 41mmol/mol (Still in range) but I was very ill back end of last year and was prescribed Steroid meds and Antibiotics which impacted my bgls, so I wasn't at all surprised at the result. Even so I'm still in non-diabetic range ~ or as some say, in remission and I continue to manage my Diabetes with a low carb diet best I can ~ with the occasional treat ~ just occasionally! Its not easy I hasten to add as I still have a sweet tooth!

You WILL achieve what you're aiming for Toucan with determination & tenacity. It's a headache sometimes trying to find a happy balance but it CAN be done. Sending you lots of good luck wishes.
WL
 

Nielh123

Active Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
I'm reading this now. Amazing how such a dry subject can be communicated in such an entertaining way. I'm still laughing at the line-up of suspects for the mass murder of beta cells (you'll have to read the book!)
 

Sticksman

Member
Relationship to Diabetes
At risk of diabetes
The key message I got from the book was to “lose 15kg” if you weigh more than 80kg or “lose 15%” of your body weight if you weigh less than 80kg. This will help you avoid type 2 or be rid of it. Prof’ Taylor’s research shows that how you lose the calories from your diet is not important, just lose the 15kg and then maintain your new weight at that level or lighter. This really does it for me as a newly diagnosed pre-diabetic. I was floundering with the complexity of advice about diet and the dogmatic evangelising of the “doctor gurus“ on youtube and elsewhere. As a sufferer from reflux, choosing foods is particularly difficult with the many conflicts of ideal eating for diabetes. I am currently half way to the 15kg target having adopted a very bespoke diet that I feel I could adopt for life if it works. Fingers crossed.
 
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Gwynn

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 2
Sticksman, yup, keep it going and hopefully you will be rewarded with better health and no diabetic issues.
 

helli

Well-Known Member
Relationship to Diabetes
Type 1
My reading was to lose 15 percent .of your weight, not 15kg.
This could be significantly different. For example 15kg would be about 25 of my weight and put me in the underweight BMI category.
 
D

Deleted member 33972

Guest
‘Life Without Diabetes’ by Professor Roy Taylor
I found the book easy to read and informative, and it changed my perspective of the ‘Newcastle Diet’, as well as several other pre-conceptions.
It can be used as a guide to the ‘Newcastle Diet’ – just start reading at Chapter 7, but there is also some interesting information in the rest of the book.

There is an explanation of what Type 2 diabetes is, and how glucose and fat are handled in the body, and Professor Taylor describes his theory on the genetic input to diabetes. This leads to challenging the link between obesity and diabetes, and an explanation of why a large number of obese people are not diabetic, and many outwardly thin people are diabetic.

He defines a ‘personal fat threshold’, if exceeded this means that there is too much fat stored internally particularly around the liver and pancreas, which disrupts the production of insulin.

He concludes that the solution is a significant weight loss to seriously diminish the fat around the liver and pancreas. For most newly diagnosed Type 2 sufferers he suggests as weight decrease of around 15kgs, and a permanent decrease in food consumption on average by 25%. How this is achieved is not so important as the end result of weight loss, and sustained new eating habits.

The ‘Newcastle diet’ is one way, but it is more important that the individual finds the way that is right for them e.g Low Carb ,Mediterranean, intermittent fasting etc. Either rapid weight loss or slower weight loss over a longer period is an acceptable way to achieve the goal. The various approaches are all outlined. There is no ‘one size fits all’.

The Newcastle Diet arose as part of his research, when he needed a group of Type 2’s to lose weight rapidly, so that he could analyse the effects. Hence the milk shakes etc were just a simple way of doing this. The group however were so overwhelming happy with the result that the idea spread and the ‘Newcastle Diet’ evolved.

There are clear instructions on the 3 phases of the diet in the book, plus some useful recipes. Milkshakes aren’t essential in the first phase, and it can be any nutritious daily food intake of 800cals. Phases 2 and 3 provide a gradual move to sustainable healthy eating.

I particularly enjoyed Chapter 9 ‘Don’t be fooled’, which discusses the plethora of health stories that are always around. It put forward ideas on how to sort out solid information from misleading observations or baseline opinion.

All in all a surprisingly informative, good read.
As you probably know I’m doing SW and I’ve lost about 25 lbs in about 16 weeks now. I never lost anything yesterday and gained a pound. There’s lots of groups on Facebook and recipes on YouTube For SW. The Facegroup SW posts from users were an eye opener. They were using slim fast and dieting. this might be ok for people like myself who are obese but a lot of these young women are very thin and want to fade away to be like the modern models. There’s a threshold fir weight loss groups before you can join them. A combination of shakes and slimming diet would never have entered my head. It’s OK under medical supervision. I’m glad you said that his study says any way you lose the weight. I’m getting worried because I’ve read there’s a tIme period for losing it to go into remission . 12 weeks and 16 weeks at the most after diagnosis. I might have to rethink what I’m doing shortly and my subscription ends soon. I’ve known people finish the NHS courses, not Oviva, and join SW after to lose more weight. I’ve to go on a course because I’ve got obstructive sleep apnoea and had it for years. I was recently told I should have been referred when I was diagnosed, although in fairness my weight has gone up and done for the last 20 years. I also don’t want a set back as I had infusions for osteoporosis when I was 49 as I took it early. I’ve gained 14% bone density through Allendronic acid infusions over a 3 year period and I don’t want to lose it because of bad diet and lack of calcium.
 
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